Lee collet die vs. rcbs neck die

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by trazman, Oct 1, 2013.

  1. trazman

    trazman Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys, I have the .300 win mag lee collet die and rcbs neck sizing die which is better and why?
     
  2. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    Try both and see.

    I've used both for a 7mm magnum, and the loads shot identically. I could not tell the difference with that ammo in that rifle.

    Having said that I would generally put a neck bushing die ahead of a collet die for repeatability, and I'm contemplating a Redding bushing die for my 270 since I can't get what I want with a Lee collet die with regard to consistent neck sizing.
     

  3. woods

    woods Well-Known Member

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    LEE COLLET

    PROS - straighter ammo (less runout), no lube in neck, more consistant ID
    CONS - less bullet grip (unless you order a smaller mandrel or sand one down), learning curve

    RCBS EXPANDER TYPE NECK SIZER

    PROS - no learning curve
    CONS - lube in neck, more runout


    UHHH...................Lee Collet much better IMO
     
  4. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Lube in neck? Not here, never. NADA.

    I like them both actually.
     
  5. DocB

    DocB Well-Known Member

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    Sir, would you mind elaborating a bit on this. How would I go about determining the amount of grip being applied and what size smaller mandrel would be needed for 300WM? By sanding down a collet mandrel, wouldn't that increase the ID on the mandrel somewhat?

    Thanks,

    DocB
     
  6. Kevin Thomas

    Kevin Thomas Well-Known Member

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    I am still at a complete and total loss as to the fascination with Neck Dies. Problems, plain and simple, just looking for a place to happen. They don't increase accuracy over F/L sizing, and assuming the F/L dies are set up properly, they don't add a bit of case life.
     
  7. woods

    woods Well-Known Member

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    The amount of grip is up to you. General consensus is bullet grip from .001" to .003" (less than diameter of bullet)

    You can get an approximation of bullet grip by measuring outside neck diameter of a sized but unloaded case and a loaded case, subtract the 2. Not very accurate

    There are other tools. I use a set of pin gauges

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    You can order mandrels from Lee in whatever diameter you want (minimum order applies, $15.00 or more IIRC)

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    Some prefer to chuck the mandrel in a drill and hold sandpaper on it. I had miserable results with that, hard to get consistent results from top to bottom and keep it perfectly round, YMMV
     
  8. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Hell with sandpaper, chuck it in a 5C spin index, mount the spin index on your mag chuck and grind it to size. Of course you need a surface grinder to size it...we have one of those.....

    An alternative would be to use a toolpost grinder and your lathe and collet closer attachment. Have that too,
     
  9. DocB

    DocB Well-Known Member

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    Dang... You guys got all the neat toys!! :D

    DocB
     
  10. Bodywerks

    Bodywerks Well-Known Member

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    Agreed, unless he's talking about their bushing dies. Bushing dies have the potential to form truer.
     
  11. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Bushing dies are a bit hard to get. I order direct from RCBS and Redding and I've experienced backorder situations lately....
     
  12. Bart B

    Bart B Well-Known Member

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    Me too, but I'm convinced the reasons they do neck size is they don't understand how bottleneck cases headspacing on their shoulders fit the chamber aligning the bullet with the bore when fired as well as how firing and sizing changes the case shape and dimensions.

    One common thinking is neck sized cases fit the chamber better than full length sized ones as they rest on the chamber bottom when fired. Sierra Bullets put this reason in one of their loading manuals years ago. I mentioned this to Martin Hull and he laughed.
     
  13. trazman

    trazman Well-Known Member

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    So what are you guys saying that it is better to full size in a proper way or I dont understand something?
     
  14. Bart B

    Bart B Well-Known Member

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    Yes, it's better to properly full length size bottleneck cases.

    What do you think centers a .308 round's bullet in the bore when the primer fires and starts burning the powder before the bullet moves?