laminate stocks

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by D.A.T., Aug 13, 2010.

  1. D.A.T.

    D.A.T. Well-Known Member

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    ive always used wood and synthetic stocks,is laminate more water resistant than wood?and do they accumulate moisture?:)
     
  2. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    No, They are impregnated with resin under high pressure and are very stable and weather
    resistant. They are also very stable due to the many different ply's with the grain running in
    many different directions.

    I have replaced all but a few of my synthetic stocks because they are better balanced, and
    as I said very stable (More so than a lot of synthetic stocks) they have the feel and looks of
    wood and they dampen the harmonics much better. with out exception all of the rifles stocks
    that were replaced improved the accuracy and consistency.

    They are also not as noisy as the synthetics when scraped by brush and weeds while hunting.

    There is still nothing that looks better than a fine piece of wood but for performance the
    laminate is hard to beat.

    Just my opinion

    J E CUSTOM
     

  3. Fitch

    Fitch Well-Known Member

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    +1

    Fitch
     
  4. Joel Russo

    Joel Russo Official LRH Sponsor

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    Just keep in mind that regardless of whether a stock is made from laminated wood or hardwood, it's ability to resist moisture, is only as good as the finish that's applied to it.
     
  5. D.A.T.

    D.A.T. Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the info,i found a couple of comfortable stocks that are laminated
     
  6. hammertyme

    hammertyme Well-Known Member

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    Coming from many backgrounds starting in a cabinet shop I can honestly say that every material moves be it walnut,plastic,steel,aluminum. One of the very worst is aluminum.
    Rutland plywood comes with movement pent up inside from the manufacturer.
    If you doubt the last statement, take a 12" X 36" piece of 2" thick material from Rutland and saw it lengthwise through the length of the 36 inches making yourself two pieces of 12 X 36" by 1" thick. The moment those two pieces clear the bandsaw they both instantly bow anywhere from 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch and they keep warping until the stress of manufacturing has been elliminated.
    The pretty laminates colors of todays gunstock plywood do NOT come in cross laminate like construction grade plywood. All laminates run parallel! That is why many times when a cutter is making a verticle grip stock it will crack right through the grip area. That and the resin has gotten to hot and made the wood hard and brittle. I worked a number of years in a plywood plant directly after working in dad's cabinet shop.
    During the past two decades I have found two materials that were inert and did not move before,during and after machining. One is a bit heavy material designed by Boeing for the aircraft industry about 60 years ago. Extremely tough on carbide bandsaws and carbide endmills so we quite using it. The other I told Jim See about and he is currently making rifle stocks with the material. Besides being the most stable material I have run across to date, it is the lightest after carbon fiber and is as strong as anything one might want to make a gun stock out of and still carry it.
    One of the properties of this new material to pass the grading process is it must be submersed in water for 48 hours and not come apart nor soak up water. Some other interesting properties was when the first sheet arrived at the cutters. I got a call from the cutter regarding how absolute flat the material was before during and after cutting from the large sheet 4' X8' into stock sized material. How, after cutting into a stock and submersed in water the stuff did not move. Absolute verticle A2,A5 and Tuley style grip stocks the wrist was virtually unbreakable before any finish was applied.

    Ever take one of those pretty laminate stocks, hold it over your head and dropped it on a concrete shop floor? I have and I was not happy with the results. The old walnut stocks are a much better material. The new walnut and maple laminates are even a better more stable material of dried correctly.

    Neal
     
  7. MTBULLET

    MTBULLET Well-Known Member

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    i use accurate innovations laminates, rock solid, 100% drop in, and "purty"
     
  8. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Like everything there are always differences in the manufacture of any material so
    I can only comment on the laminates I have owned and on the durability of these stocks.

    I have found them to be very stable and durable If the laminating process is done right
    they are very stable and water prof to a reasonable point.

    I make custom knifes and use laminated wood for the scales (Handles) and also exotic woods
    that have been stabilized. ( A process that forces resin in to the woods cellular structure
    making it almost 100% resin) and these knifes can be placed in a dishwasher without harm.

    I have never had the desire to submerge a rifle stock in water for 24 hours so I don't know
    what would happen but who would do this to a stock of any kind.

    There are some materials that are more stable. but they dont have the looks and feel of wood
    and in some cases they even amplify the sound and the harmonics.

    My preference is still the laminates for there all round qualities and price.

    Every type of material has it's strong points and it's weaknesses so like a lot of things
    it comes down to what you like and are willing to pay for it.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  9. D.A.T.

    D.A.T. Well-Known Member

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    thanks for the info,ive found a couple laminated stocks i like so im going to try one.
     
  10. Joel Russo

    Joel Russo Official LRH Sponsor

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    I agree 100%.
     
  11. blacktails

    blacktails Well-Known Member

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    Can you or someone else recommend some good laminate stocks for general hunting rifles? Laminates are "supposedly" a heavier stock as compared to regular wood or synthetics, so are there any recommended ways to lighten them up?

    I prefer to hunt in the rain here in Washington, and the finish on some of my wood stocked rifles has suffered because of it, so would I be better off going with a quality laminate or a McMillan on a new build? I'm planning on a finished weight comparable to a M700 Mtn. Rifle or less, and had been thinking a McM. Mtn. Rifle stock in Edge.
     
  12. tenwalker

    tenwalker Active Member

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    This a laminate that Joel Russo put together for me.





    [​IMG]
     
  13. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Joel does nice work and puts a good finish on his stocks.

    The weight of the Laminate is what you want for proper balance.(It is only a little
    heaver than composites) and has the weight in the butt stock where its needed.

    I have seen a lot of people buy a composit and have to add weight to the butt for recoil
    reduction or balance, So why not buy a laminate in the first place if you are going to add weight.

    J E CUSTOM
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2010
  14. asa

    asa Well-Known Member

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    Another vote for a laminate stock I have one of Joels on my .338 edge ai and love it.