Just getting into it...

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by jnagel32, Oct 13, 2013.

  1. jnagel32

    jnagel32 Member

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    I'm looking to get into semi long range shooting. I would like to be able to shoot good groups consistently at 5-600 yards. I wouldn't mind being able to reach out and touch something at a 1000 eventually, but I just want to focus on 5-600 yards right now. I have a Browning A-Bolt in .300 WSM. I just picked up a Leupold VX-2 6-18x40mm Adj Obj Target Turret scope for a great price. Initially, I was looking at a Vortex Viper, but for $130 less I got the Leupold. Leupold's site states that the scope has 67 MOA elevation and windage. Is this enough for 5-600 yards or even longer? I'm looking to get Talley one-piece scope rings as well, so I don't know if they add any MOA or not. I just purchased a bunch of reloading equipment and supplies. So I am going to learn to reload and work up some loads eventually. Any other things that I need to consider or any other advice?
     
  2. RockyMtnMT

    RockyMtnMT Official LRH Sponsor

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    Get a good re loading manual and read it front to back. You're scope and rifle will have you going fine. Let em fly.

    Steve
     

  3. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    Your browning is already shooting good?
     
  4. Derek M.

    Derek M. Well-Known Member

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    As I see it one of the only problems you face is the Browning barrel weight and contour. Usually they are pencil thin. Doesn't mean you can't have satisfactory accuracy to 500 yards, however. There's a lot to precision reloading. Here's a list of some important factors:

    1. resize all brass, even if new, and trim to same length. I weight sort mine and I buy plenty of brass with the same lot #

    2. deburr flash holes

    3. when resizing your fired cases, make sure shoulder is only bumped back .001-.002. You will need a gauge for this.

    4. Use the best primers you can get. I only use Federal match.

    5. Weigh each powder charge.

    6. Weight sort bullets and measure bearing surface and sort. You'll need the tools.

    7. Seat bullets according to ogive and mag fit and take note of COAL.

    8. chrono loads

    9. You don't have to have one but I use a concentricity gauge to measure runout.

    10. I do not use an expander in my sizing die. I take my preferred brass per rifle, stuff in my preferred bullet and measure OD of case neck to make a dummy round. I send the dummy round and die back to die manufacturer and have them hone the die neck to 0.0025-0.003 less than the loaded case. That measurement is your choice. Eliminating the expander button/ball has greatly reduced work hardening on the brass and also the runout. No more lubing the inside case neck, and a whole lot less runout worries. ---- of interest, I noticed my Redding 270 sizing die was squeezing my case necks about 15 thousandths prior to my requested modification! That is ridiculous and work hardens the brass way too much. From such a reputable company, I was very disappointed.

    11. If I feel like it, with certain rifles, I will outside neck turn my case necks. It works, trust me.

    12. When I seat a bullet, I seat about a 1/3, then rotate the case about 60-90 degrees, seat a little deeper, then repeat, then fully seat. This also tends to reduce runout.

    There's a few items in case you were not aware of them
     
  5. jnagel32

    jnagel32 Member

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    Thanks for the replies guys.

    As far as the Browning shooting well already. I'm not sure. I haven't had it to the range in a long time. The last time I shot it was 4 or 5 years ago at an 8 pt on a power line and it was around 250 yards away. I put two shots behind the front shoulder in about 3-5 seconds I would estimate. So I think it shoots decently, but I'm willing to spend a little money to get it to shoot better. I didn't realize the barrels are so thin on the Brownings. What would you recommend for a replacement barrel if I were to get one? How are Shaw barrels? They are only a couple hours away from me...

    Thanks for the reloading info. Definitely a little over my head as I am new to reloading, but I'll keep it for as I get more experience.
     
  6. Derek M.

    Derek M. Well-Known Member

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    Don't know much at all about Shaw barrels. I tend to stick with the barrel makers who provide winning tubes on the competition level. Otherwise, I feel like I'm wasting my time. As to replacement bbl contour, for your caliber, I'd go with at least a #4 or #4.5 10T and 25-26" long.
     
  7. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    good groups at 500-600 yards. the easiest way- is to rebarrel a remington 700 with a know n barrel ; hart, krieger, brux in the caliber of your choice. the heavier it is the better it is for targets. or you can take your leup/browning combo and see how it does.
     
  8. snowpro440

    snowpro440 Well-Known Member

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    E.R. Shaw barrels are pretty good as I have 2 of them in a bull contour.308 and 7 mag . As far as case prep clean your brass an inside case necks and primer pockets. I use cci primers in some calibers an fed mag match in others, Its always what your gun likes. The more time you spend prepping your brass and bullets the easier the groups will come together, measure, measure, measure ! consistency ....
     
  9. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    what derek said plus- i have never shot in competition against a shaw barrel. weigh this measure that it won't shoot like a krieger/r emington or sako/hart.
     
  10. WhiteFang

    WhiteFang New Member

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    I was informed that the Brownings are not meant to be rebarrelled since they use the red lock tight.
     
  11. angus-5024

    angus-5024 Well-Known Member

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    If your wanting to shoot a lot of target, the new tube is a good idea if you can find a smith that will re-barrel a browning.

    If the gun already shoots good, I would keep the barrel and use it as a hunting rifle. When you shoot targets with it just keep an eye on how hot the tube is getting. Never shoot back to back (unless at game) and between rounds keep the action open for cooling. I do this with a sporter weight .338 RUM (a lot more pow) and it works well.
    Then I would buy myself a target rifle (SENDURO or Coyote light). The rest of the advise has been sound thus far, going with a remmy might be easier/more cost effective in the long run.
     
  12. snowpro440

    snowpro440 Well-Known Member

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    Are we shooting benchrest competition ? or paper targets and hunting game ?
    Can you prove that statement ron ? I will upload some pics later.
     
  13. cohunter14

    cohunter14 Well-Known Member

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    I think everyone is getting a little carried away here. The first thing to do is start reloading and see if you can come up with an accurate load with your current rifle as-is. You don't need a 1/2 MOA gun to shoot at 500-600 yards. 1 MOA is more than enough, and you might easily be able to get there with fine tuning your loads. Start there and see what happens before investing $300+ in a rebarrel.
     
  14. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    Snow prow - i can't prove it. none of the competitors i know use a shaw barrel.