John McCain's remarks about the Pledge of Allegiance

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by philny1, Jun 2, 2008.

  1. philny1

    philny1 Well-Known Member

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    John McCain's remarks about the Pledge of Allegiance

    In light of the recent appeals court ruling in California, with respect to the Pledge of Allegiance, the following recollection from Senator John McCain is very appropriate:

    'The Pledge of Allegiance' - by Senator John McCain

    'As you may know, I spent five and one half years as a prisoner of war during the Vietnam War. In the early years of our imprisonment, the NVA kept us in solitary confinement or two or three to a cell. In 1971 the NVA moved us from these conditions of isolation into large rooms with as many as 30 to 40 men to a room.

    This was, as you can imagine, a wonderful change and was a direct result of the efforts of millions of Americans on behalf of a few hundred POWs 10,000 miles from home.

    One of the men who moved into my room was a young man named Mike Christian.

    Mike came from a small town near Selma , Alabama . He didn't wear a pair of shoes until he was 13 years old. At 17, he enlisted in the US Navy. He later earned a commission by going to Officer Training School Then he became a Naval Flight Officer and was shot down and captured in 1967. Mike had a keen and deep appreciation of the opportunities this country and our military provide for people who want to work and want to succeed.

    As part of the change in treatment, the Vietnamese allowed some prisoners to receive packages from home. In some of these packages were handkerchiefs, scarves and other items of clothing.

    Mike got himself a bamboo needle. Over a period of a couple of months, he created an American flag and sewed on the inside of his shirt.

    Every afternoon, before we had a bowl of soup, we would hang Mike's shirt on the wall of the cell and say the Pledge of Allegiance.

    I know the Pledge of Allegiance may not seem the most important part of our day now, but I can assure you that in that stark cell it was indeed the most important and meaningful event.
    One day the Vietnamese searched our cell, as they did periodically, and discovered Mike's shirt with the flag sewn inside, and removed it.
    That evening they returned, opened the door of the cell, and for the benefit of all of us, beat Mike Christian sever ely for the next couple of hours. Then, they opened the door of the cell and threw him in. We cleaned him up as well as we could.


    The cell in which we lived had a concrete slab in the middle on which we slept Four naked light bulbs hung in each corner of the room.


    As I said, we tried to clean up Mike as well as we could. After the excitement died down, I looked in the corner of the room, and sitting there beneath that dim light bulb with a piece of red cloth, another shirt and his bamboo needle, was my friend, Mike Christian. He was sitting there with his eyes almost shut from the beating he had received, making another American flag. He was not making the flag because it made Mike Christian feel better. He was making that f lag because he knew how important it was to us to be able to Pledge our allegiance to our flag and country.

    So the next time you say the Pledge of Allegiance, you must never forget the sacrifice and courage that thousands of Americans have made to build our nation and promote freedom around the world. You must remember our duty, our honor, and our country.'

    'I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisable, with liberty and justice for all.'

    PASS THIS ON... And on... And on! You can even send it back to me, I don't mind, because its worth reading again.

    oh......and then you have this clown, who refuses to place his hand on his heart and say the pledge......
     
  2. telkev

    telkev Active Member

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    21 years ago, when I was in training a Kesler Air Force Base, I had the opportunity to hear an inspirational speach by Sen. McCain. Over a thousand people sitting in an auditorium with the Senetor in his dress uniform. For over an hour you could not hear anything but his voice, telling stories of being a POW, and the struggles to survive the day to day tortures and humilities that they faced. You could hear a pin drop in that auditorium. No sound but his voice. Anyone who has a problem with the pledge of allegiance should also have a problem with voting, and should be required to withstain from all elections. Personally, I think they should move to vietnam and become indentured servants to the military there. Maybe then they will realize how good a life they really had.
     

  3. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    It's just beautiful!!!
    It's sad that there are so many trying to mess with it!!! Makes me angry...:mad:
    Javier Moncada
     
  4. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    There is a reason Len keeps moving threads like this down to the rabies quarantine area and out of the hunting section.

    The thread was just insulting at first and now it has become bigoted.
     
  5. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    BB,

    What am I missing here? Would you please explain?
     
  6. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    Eaglet
    I seldom say the pledge of allegiance. It is meaningless for me. I will normally salute the flag but if saluting is not appropriate then I do nothing. I enjoy the act of saluting the flag.

    When I returned from RVN there were two kinds of people. Those who went and those who didn't. It seemed to me that those who didn't were the ones more likely to be seen in public reciting the pledge. Perhaps that is untrue but it is the way it seemed to me.

    With an all volunteer army it is easy for people to be patriotic being as it will be somebody else's job to die for the nation. When we all had to serve, patriotism had a higher cost.

    So, my bottom line is that standing up in public and saying words doesn't demonstrate anything. Even a parrot can be trained to do that. It is pretty much like this forum, you can run your mouth or you can go and shoot something. I tend to enjoy the people who go hunting and post up some good pictures.

    I have no problem with John McCains story but the insult delivered as a post script is irritating and then Telkev has to act like a bigot and state that patriotism is only his way and no other way and anybody who acts differently from his established rules needs punishment.

    Len has move the last two threads like this and I do not understand why Phil couldn't take the hint and put it where Len has been putting stuff like this. I do nto goo down there because I know what is in those thread. I like Phil and he is a nice guy, but I don't need his political views. I have my own, thank you very much.
     
  7. telkev

    telkev Active Member

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    If patriotizm = bigot , then I am guilty as charged! If choosing to serve my country = bigot, then again I am guilty as charged. I sentence myself to freedom, and the right to say whatever I want, just as you have buffalobob. And as for myself, I always salute the flag too. I don't think someone has to be drafted or serve their country voluntarily to be patriotic. If the statement that I made, makes me a bigot, then I am a bigot. I don't think anyone who does not love this country has the right to make the dicisons for it. That does not mean that I agree with everything the government and lawmakers do, but this is still a free country. I also believe in capital punishment, does that make me a bigot too?
     
  8. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    There was a story on the news the other night about a female medic assigned to an infantry unit in Iraq or Afghanistan. Even though it was prohibited, she was running combat missions with the infantrymen. The infantry company commander knew and the infantry platoon leaders knew it was prohibited. She was the only medic available and she went and did whatever needed to be done.

    I am sure nobody asked her to recite the pledge of allegiance before a mission to prove she was a patriot. Her pledge was picking up the OD satchel with the red cross on it and slinging over her shoulder. That satchel with the cross was her pledge and her promise even unto her death would she honor that satchel with the cross and what it stands for.

    I would suspect that even twenty years from now if you put that satchel in front of her and tell her she is needed, she will pick it up and go. Only people like Telkev and Phil would ask her to first recite the pledge of allegiance to make sure she is a good American patriot. But as I said, it is meaningless. She is willing to give her life just because of a little satchel with a cross on it.
     
  9. pinshootr

    pinshootr Well-Known Member

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    were is the bigotry ????????
    Cause it sounds like if were not RVN we are nothing to you. which is fine but don't be putting us veterans down just because we could not serve with you.
     
  10. telkev

    telkev Active Member

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    The american flag gets persecuted enough around the world by people who don't even know why they are doing it, it should not take ciriticism on it own soil. Immigrants have come to this country for two hundred years to find a better life for themselves and their families. To become a citizen of this country, they pledged their allegance to it, giving them the right to vote, bear arms, free speach, and everything we take for granted. The flag is a symbol of this country and its freedom. I, as well as most of you reading this, was born a citizen of this country, and was never questioned of it. Why should we not have to pledge our allegance to the flag and country as they did.

    I would not dare question the patriotizm of that female medic. Apparently she has already done that by volunteering. Quite frankly, they should give her a medal. Bet she would even be proud of it. She should. I don't know her, or know exactly what she did, and I'm proud of her.

    My point is, if you cannot pledge yourself to the flag, the national symbol of our country, how can you pledge yourself to the country? If you cannot pledge yourself to the country, why are you a citizen of it? If you are not a citizen of it, you don't have the right to vote, turn your guns in, because you don't have a right to them either, and just fade into the darkness.

    THE END
     
  11. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    Telkev

    That was a nice post you made. Everything you said I agree with. This Fall you go and vote how you please and I will go and vote how I please.

    Sorry about getting upset. Some days I am a little more mellow than others.

    THE END
     
  12. WildcatB

    WildcatB Well-Known Member

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    telkev and Buffalobob... nice words. Great resolve. Makes me think of this quote: "War is hell. But sometimes necessary." Good shooting to you both. I'm very thankful I live in the USA.



     
  13. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    AMEN!
     
  14. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    AMEN!