Jewell Trigger Fitment Issues: Remington 700 SPS Varmint

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by Farmerbeau, Jun 29, 2010.

  1. Farmerbeau

    Farmerbeau Member

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    Jun 25, 2010
    Howdy,

    This is my first post here and I'm kind of a newbie to long range hunting and precision rifles but I've been hunting since I was a boy. I searched this forum as well as google and havent seen anybody else with this issue.

    I bought a Remington 700 SPS Varmint chambered in .300 WSM last week and decided the stock trigger had to go. I went ahead and ordered a Jewell BR and recieved it yesterday. I installed it this afternoon and the saftey is obstructed by this POS plastic stock. It must be in the "FIRE" position in order to close. I plan on getting an H-S precision stock but this rose a few questions.

    Has anyone else experienced this? If so, did they have the same issue with an aftermarket stock?

    I know I could easily take a dremel and be done with it but I'm pretty sure I dont want to do that with a $300+ composite/aluminum chasis stock.


    Thanks guys.

    Beau
     
  2. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Jul 29, 2004
    It is common for all after market stocks to have to be opened up to except different triggers.

    The problem you have is at the front of the trigger inletting (TO short to allow the safety linkage to travel forward).

    This is common and will not hurt the stock by clearing the Trigger.

    Some after market triggers are wider than the factory trigger and the in letting has to be opened
    up .

    As I said it will not hurt the stock and the new trigger will be worth the effort.

    J E CUSTOM
     

  3. Farmerbeau

    Farmerbeau Member

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    Jun 25, 2010
    Cool beans! I seriously couldnt find anything about it. Perhaps I was looking in the wrong place.




    Kind of Offtopic:
    Also, Remington's website doesnt have ANY info about this particular chambering in the SPS Varmint. It seems like they dont even manufacture it. I dont know what kind of twist rate I have or anything. Can anybody shed some light on my missing info. I've searched for it on the internet but all that I have found is that the 300WSM has a 24" barrel and mine obviously has a 26" barrel. Its almost like this gun was never made in mass quantities.
     
  4. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    Mar 31, 2010
    Checking twist is a reasonably easy task. All you need is a felt tip marker (I like a 'Sharpie'), a measuring stick or tape measure, and a cleaning rod and tight fitting patch. The cleaning rod needs to be one that the felt tip marker will mark on and you need to be able to see the marks you make. Can be difficult with a blk. coated rod. I use a "Dewey" brass rod or you could use an aluminum one. Either way , you'll need a rod with bearings (so the rod will rotate easily). You can use either a cleaning jag or a loop on the rod. Put an oversize patch on the rod, but not so tight you can't move it, but, it needs to be tight fitting to the bore. Trim a patch if need be. Push the rod w/ tight patch 8 or 10 inches into the bore. Now put a small mark on the top of the rod at the handle. Put another mark on top the rod at the rear bridge of the action. Push the rod further down the barrel watching the mark you made at the handle. When the mark at the handle has made a complete revolution, stop and make another mark at the rear bridge. Remove the rod w/ tight fitting patch. Measure between the marks that were made at the rear bridge. This distance is the twist rate. ( If the rod traveled 10" before the mark at the handle was back in the starting position, your twist rate would be 1 in 10 inches.) You could use a coated rod that is undersize (say, a .22 cal rod) if you applied masking tap so you could put marks on it. lightbulb I've never had too much trouble with Jewel Triggers and H-S stocks. If there is any problem it will be on the 'safety side' of the trigger. If you are uneasy about hacking on a $300+ stock find a pro. Not everything is 'drop it'.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2010
  5. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

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    shortgrass, did you come up with that method of measuring twist? I like it, pretty neat. Thanks for sharing.
     
  6. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    Just common sense and paying attention to what I was doing, Chas1. I hope I've learned something after 2 years of gunsmithing school and 17 yrs. of putting what I learned there into practice (learned more in the 17yrs. of practice than the 2yrs. in school, but school got me started off on the right foot, several years of previous job shop [machining] experience didn't hurt either). They say "Even a blind squirrel finds a nut". And, I'm sure that method of checking twist rate has been used by someone else some where at some time before.
     
  7. ilscungilli

    ilscungilli Well-Known Member

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    I've had to take the dremel to all the stocks that I have with jewel triggers. The safety on the outside of the trigger binds against the bottom ledge on the stock. You have to mill down about 3-4 mm along that ledge in most cases. I generally only remove enough to make it work, and then add a little for clearance. Just take out the trigger guard, and look from where the trigger protrudes. Mark the inside of the stock with a pen, and then dremel a little, etc. Might as well practice on that plastic stock.
     
  8. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

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    shortgrass, thanks for responding. Well if anyone askes where I learned it from I'm gonna tell em...shortgrass:). Thanks for teaching me something.