is glass bedding a stock worth it?

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by diderr, Jan 2, 2008.

  1. diderr

    diderr Well-Known Member

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    Is the accuracy gain substantially worth doing this?
     
  2. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    If there is a gain in accuracy, any gain, it is worth it.

    If done properly the accuracy will be maintained from year to year for years.
     

  3. blackco

    blackco Well-Known Member

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    I only have limited experience but the only way to find out if it is "substantially worth" it is to try. The one thing you should definatly gain by bedding it is consistancy; from year to year and in different conditions.

    Another thing; how accurate is the rifle right now? If it is shooting 1.5" groups you MIGHT get .5-.75 improvment. But if it is already shooting .25" groups you're not going to improve much on that.

    Another thing to consider is if you are just a little bit handy, glass bedding a rifle isn't all that hard to do yourself.

    Good luck.
     
  4. long ranger

    long ranger Well-Known Member

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    If done properly in 99% of rifle YES it is. Some rifles depend on foreend pressure points to attain accuracy and some designs ie lever actions are not suited to bedding.
    Last spring we did a trial with a police tac unit that uses Remington 700 Police rifles. H.S. Precision who makes the stocks for these rifles claim that their v block bedding block does not require bedding for optimum accuracy. We proved this was not correct simply by having a spare stock from a 700P that we skim bedded the action and supported the shank of the barrel with bedding compound, then moved the same barrelled action from 1 stock to the other. The non bedded stock using the same Federal GM Match ammo shot 3 times larger a grouping than the bedded stock version did. To fully drive the point home, we completely removed the action screws and the rifle still shot far better groups than the non bedded version did. Needless to say I do not recommend shooting a rrifle with no action screws in it to keep it together but the unit got the idea. If your action screw loosen or stretch at all accuracy will suffer, wood stocks can swell or shrink depending on humidity which further complicate the equation.
    Bedding properly is not brain surgery, but there are some tricks to getting it to maximize accuracy.
     
  5. diderr

    diderr Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the info!!!! Do you know any websites that offer good directions on how to bed a stock?
     
  6. diderr

    diderr Well-Known Member

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    what do you bed? The front of the action, and a couple inches into the barrel? What are the "sweet spots" to bed to reach peak accuracy?
     
  7. buck5611

    buck5611 Member

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  8. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    Glass bedding

    Glass bedding is not only "worth it", it is absolutely essential for someone deciding to participate in what this site is all about.

    Being a gunmaker specializing in 1000 yard competitive and "ludicrous" range hunting rifles, I can personally vouch for the necessity of bedding.

    All the reasons listed in previous posts are valid so I'll end up being redundant with what I'd have to contribute.

    Just know that not all bedding jobs are created equal and you get what you pay for when it comes to stock work.

    If you have any doubts, take it to someone who understands that long range bolt guns require attention to detail. Reputations and track records mean a lot here.

    I don't claim to be the end all source of knowledge, but I can tell you that rifles I've built have claimed world championships, "real" trigger time in Iraq, and kills as far as 2552 yards on prairie dogs in Wyoming.

    I don't know everything, but I like to think I do know what works.

    Hope this helped in some way.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. diderr

    diderr Well-Known Member

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    wow! thats clean.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Strick9

    Strick9 Well-Known Member

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    Yep,,that is super smooth and clean,,now take the barrel of a standard 700 Rem and decide for yourself,,Gotta get it done,,me two..
     
  11. Varmint

    Varmint Well-Known Member

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    Chad

    Nice job and that is the way I do all my gun....but I also like to bed under the barrel the lengh of the chamber this is what I like to do not for every one ,but I think it helps, just me.I only use the brownells steel bedding,again just me.Tim
    PS Long Ranger you are right on the money with your trial run with the two stocks.....I know you will know this but if you look at the unbedded stock you will see where the action rides in the block and leaves two lines (or marks) on the bedding block. So when ever I had a HS stock I would do the same thing with it ....a skim coat and it does make a differents. Tim
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2008
  12. wildcat

    wildcat Well-Known Member

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    Yes, it is well worth it.
     
  13. RMulhern

    RMulhern Well-Known Member

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    Is glass bedding worth it!

    Hmmmmmm....where have you been the last 40 or so years??