Idaho Trophy Hunts

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by srhaggerty, May 20, 2005.

  1. srhaggerty

    srhaggerty Well-Known Member

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    I just checked the Idaho website. I drew my Mountain Goat tag. I can't wait to use my 300 RUM on it...
     
  2. gonehuntingagain

    gonehuntingagain Well-Known Member

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    Those tags are hard to come by - Good Luck!
     

  3. Paul Wyatt

    Paul Wyatt Well-Known Member

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    Congratulations
    We will expect photos.
    Which unit?
     
  4. Troutslayer

    Troutslayer Well-Known Member

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    Congradulations. I eagerly await the results of my Montana applications for moose, sheep and goat. Hope I enjoy similar success, though I've learned not to hold my breath.
     
  5. srhaggerty

    srhaggerty Well-Known Member

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    Thanks all. I can't wait. This was the first time I put in for a Mountain Goat tag.

    I don't have much experience with hunting these animals. I wanted to ask which gun everyone might think is better suited for this task. I am having Kirby build me a custom 25-284 which should be done in 4 weeks or so. Given the terrain these animals are found in, would you use the 25-284 or the 300 rum?

    I drew 36B unit.
     
  6. RDM416

    RDM416 Well-Known Member

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    Congrats on drawing your goat tag! I hunted Mtn goat in northern BC 3 years ago. Many would say I was over-gunned, but I always say you can't kill them too dead. I Killed a nice 9 7/8" billy at 358yds with my .416wby.

    From my one time experience, I would reccomend the .300 ultra. I was very surprised at how big these animals are, and how much punnishment they can take. I shot mine through the boiler room with a 350grn Swift A frame. He still ran 150 yards accross a cliff face before taking a nose dive.

    Also be prepared for very steep angle shots which as I am sure you know can really screw you up especially at longer ranges.

    Good luck! Post pictures when you get back!

    Rick
     
  7. srhaggerty

    srhaggerty Well-Known Member

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    RDM416,

    I will certainly post pics when I get back. Plus a full detailed story.
     
  8. heatseekins

    heatseekins Well-Known Member

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    I have had a couple clients bring in MT goats to mount and they say they are hard to put down. My dad lives in alaska and he hunts them with a .338

    Good luck, Glen
     
  9. ss7mm

    ss7mm Writers Guild

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    srhaggerty:

    Mountain Goats are very phlegmatic and can take a lot of lead. A lot of hunters consider that, for their size, they can take more lead than much bigger animals.

    Remember that you may well get a shot at one next to, or very near to, a cliff of drop off so ideally you want to put him down as quickly as possible. A fall in the rocks could really mess up the horns.

    The last goat I took was with a 300 mag and I got lucky. He was standing in a small grassy area about 200 yards from the safety of the rocks and cliffs. Because of concern for the cape I shot him behind the shoulder at about 150 yards. He just stood there. He didn't flinch. He didn't move. I shot him a second time and again he did nothing. It was as if I was shooting at a picture. Just as I fired the second shot I could see blood spreading and working down from the first shot. After the second, it was more blood, but no reaction. At the third shot he took a step or two and just fell flat. All shots hit within a couple of inches of each other and any one would have eventually put him down, but it took a combination of 3 before he went down.

    Also, as mentioned, don't forget that the shot you get may be at a very steep uphill or downhill angle. If you don't have one, you might consider getting an ACI from "W". I use them on all my guns now and the ACI and some good software and drop tables and you're in business.

    All that said and considered I would go with the 300 RUM and a well constructed bullet. I'm not saying the 25-284 wouldn't do the job, but if it was me, I'd want to hit him with a little more than the 25 cal pill.

    Regardless of which gun you use, congratulations on drawing the tag and good luck with your hunt.
     
  10. srhaggerty

    srhaggerty Well-Known Member

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    Dick,

    Thanks for the reply. What is an ACI? Once I have determined my pet load for the 300 I will get a drop chart going. I spent four hours today shooting an array of loads I worked up.

    What built do you think would be best suited for this kind of a hunt. The best groups I got today were with 180 grain accubond. The 150's did ok (.9"@ 100). I think I have some more work to do to get those down. I am thinking though that the 180's are the way to go?
     
  11. ss7mm

    ss7mm Writers Guild

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    srhaggerty:

    See THIS SITE.

    Then use the search feature on this site and search for ACI or Angle Cosine Indicator etc. and you will get a LOT of reading.

    Short story is under field conditions I think it's great and wouldn't be without it. You also might consider a "Scopelevel" or some other similar item to help with eliminating cant. At long range it can really mess you up.

    I don't think you would go wrong with the 180 Accubond but I would also suggest that you contact Richard Graves at Wildcat Bullets wildcatbullets@hotmail.com and try some of his bullets if you haven't already. Tell Richard what you are shooting, expected ranges and he can recommend one or more of his bullets.
     
  12. srhaggerty

    srhaggerty Well-Known Member

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    Dick,

    Thanks. I do remember looking that item up a while back. Looks like it would be very handy in steep terrain.

    I have thought an awfull lots on the scope leve too.

    Actually, Richard was kind enough to call and congrad me this morning. I was actually going to discuss with him what some options might be.
     
  13. srhaggerty

    srhaggerty Well-Known Member

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    Just curious, would you all stick with the 180 Accubond or would you go 150?
     
  14. ss7mm

    ss7mm Writers Guild

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    srhaggerty:

    If it was me and I was shooting a cartridge like your 300RUM that is capable of handling a heavier 30 cal bullet at a very hefty velocity I would go with at least a 180 and probably would prefer a 200 grain Accubond. This choice would be in case I wanted to reach out and touch a nice billy. There is always the chance that you might have some good winds in the mountains and cliffs so that is another reason for the heavy bullet. It’ll get the job done and won’t move around much in the wind compared to the lighter bullet. Personally I wouldn’t even consider the 150 grain.

    A large billy is bigger through the body than you might think and I personally feel that the 200 grain Accubond or Wildcat would be a choice that would match the animal.

    I mentioned before that the last goat I shot was behind the shoulder. I knew he was quite a distance from the cliffs and rocks. Had he been anywhere close to cliffs or drop offs of any kind I would absolutely have tried to break him down asap through the front shoulders.

    I saw one, after it was recovered, that a young fella shot through the lungs and after 3 or 4 steps and lunges the billy fell over a small cliff and rolled and bounced about 250 yards down a steep rock chute. Both tips of the horns were broken off about 1” or so and he wasn’t a very happy camper.

    Whatever choice you make, have a good hunt and good luck to you!