Idaho Steps Up on Wolf Issue

Discussion in 'West' started by bigngreen, Oct 19, 2010.

  1. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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  2. Airgunner7

    Airgunner7 Well-Known Member

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    Didn't see any tracks in Salmon this year....hmmmm, looks like it is working. Every once in a while Idaho makes me proud.
    I got pretty worried once they started making money off tags last year that it would never go away.
     

  3. Long Time Long Ranger

    Long Time Long Ranger Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for posting, I hope Wyoming and Montana follow suit with this approach. Basically hunters have declared war anyway. I don't know of a jury in this state who would convict anyone for killing a wolf. They would probably want to know where he got him for future refference.
     
  4. fj40mojo

    fj40mojo Well-Known Member

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    SSS repeat often.:rolleyes:
     
  5. edinidaho

    edinidaho Member

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    not often you get to feel good about a politican.
    Ed
     
  6. Airgunner7

    Airgunner7 Well-Known Member

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    Funny how the only thing that he's done right is "nothing".




    So here I am hunting up in the high contry and I don't see any wolf tracks this year but I run into a pile of cattle...I'm thinking wtf, why would someone expose their cattle to wolfs? I guess my answer is, the locals have taken care of it.
    Now my follow up may piss off someone ...what is worse-- a wolf who eats a weak elk or a heard of cattle eating the elks food??? The days of harvesting good big game are slipping away.
     
  7. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    There aren't near the cattle in the mountains as there once was, allotments have been cut way down so the good game hunting was actually back in the day when they grazed the living daylights out of range. Out here 20yrs ago big money guys started buying ranches here and kicked out all the cows so they could have hunting preserves, they found out that game numbers decrease because the process of cattle ranching actually creates better quality habitat, specially now days with so much better management. The good days of hunting are not slipping because of cattle as there are fewer than ever and wolves don't kill just the weak. I live in the highest elk density area in MT, guess what it is the number 1 cattle producing county in MT also go figure :rolleyes:
     
  8. Airgunner7

    Airgunner7 Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. Are the Elk poulations on private ranches or public land? Ranches are going to fence Elk from hunting if they have cattle and of corse there will be a good populations on those. Please don't get me wrong, ranchers have every right to do what they want on private land-they pay the taxes on it. I'm just questioning the resources of public land. Do they eat the same food?
     
  9. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    The elk are one both private and public, in this area there is little difference. There are a couple things that cattle operations help, one is all the hay fields and range improvements that you do for cattle benefit the elk as there is more feed and higher quality the second is you need lots of water close for livestock, we try to not have a cow walk over a mile or so to water so you have developed water every where so the wildlife benefits from this also and lets them disperse wider and utilize more feed just as the cattle.

    The big rub is Brucellosis, which has been blown out of proportion. There is a very narrow window that the transmission can occur and our elk population hasn't had it so far anyway.

    Cattle don't compete for the same feed as hard as say sheep do, and there are only a few thousand sheep left in this county and they have almost zero BLM or forest time, cattle are very hard to get to over graze or even compete for feed because they are so lazy and picky, a sheep band will mow everything down to the roots and you have to be on top of them to keep them moved around.

    The ranches are so big here that there is no tall fence so elk move back and forth depending on hunter traffic, feed, and predators. The fencing you see on a normal ranch an elk herd will destroy in one pass, it is no deterrent to them.

    I'm not saying everything is perfectly compatible between livestock and wildlife but it isn't like some would have you believe that livestock are the ruin of wildlife, in fact anything that is bad for elk is bad for a cow.
     
  10. Airgunner7

    Airgunner7 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for taking the time to explain. Sounds like a good place to hunt and a good relationship.
    50% of Idaho as blm or public land. While hiking through remote forest I see huge black cows grazing at 7000+ ft., no feed or water. When conditions are right I belive they lease the rights to run the cattle through to feed from the state. I guess that is the crudy thing about public land...everybody wants to use it(me included) and the state loves the money from leasing it. Putting wolfs on it with tax dollars is about the worst idea ever-hurts ranchers and hunters alike.
     
  11. dook

    dook Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for exposing the BIG LIE. The feds knew this when they introduced the Canadian wolves....they kill both weak and healthy elk because niether one can defend themselves from wolf packs in the timbered mountains because of the short sight distance.