I know nothing....

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by AtownBcat, Mar 7, 2009.

  1. AtownBcat

    AtownBcat Well-Known Member

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    I am not reloading yet, but am interested. Is it worth it to keep all brands of brass that my son and I will shoot until i start handloading? we are currently testing several different factory loads until we can hand load. By the way we are shooting a 308, and 300 WM.

    thanks
    ryan
     
  2. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    Should you save your brass? NO! Send it to me, I'll use it before it dry rots.

    On the other hand ..... it lasts forever, doesn't take up a lot of room, so why not keep it? ;)
     

  3. britz

    britz Well-Known Member

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    brass is getting more and more expensive, so as boomtube said... Keep It! You will want to sort it by brand and possibly by weight when you start loading for you long range rifle, but it is definately worth keeping.
     
  4. BountyHunter

    BountyHunter Writers Guild

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    Keep it, sort by mftr. You can always sell it the small lots. Bras is becoming hard to get and expensive.


    Sierra reloading manual is good is good place to start reading. Several videos on the market

    check www.sinclairintl.com as they have a couple.

    BH
     
  5. AtownBcat

    AtownBcat Well-Known Member

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    OK guys thanks for the replys..i should have been more to the point but i wrote the thread on the way out the door. I guess my REAL question is: Once you work up a good load can it be used in several different brands of brass. I was trying to see if a load that shoots well in winchester brass would also shoot the same in hornady or federal. Or does the brass effect the load just like the bullet or powder would.(not asking so much about the quality of the brass but the preformance of the load) In that case it wouldn't make sense to have 40 rounds of federal laying around if i was going to use the winchester.

    thanks!
    R
     
  6. Winchester 69

    Winchester 69 Well-Known Member

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    The load is sensitive to the volume of the case. The assumption is that all cases of the same batch and brand will have similar volumes. The same load may shoot well in different cases, but to different points of impact. The question you have to answer is, what size of batch is too small to worry with.

    Another consideration is that some brands of brass are too soft to successfully reload numerous times. They may not be worth bothering with if you don't have large quantities. Whatever you keep, sort by brand.
     
  7. johnnyk

    johnnyk Well-Known Member

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    Ryan,
    Yes, it does matter. The difference lies in the internal capacities. This difference causes different pressures, thus different velocities, different barrel harmonics, right on down the line. If you develop a load with Federal brass and decide to switch to another make you should start over on load development. At least that's the theory behind it and that's what's been told forever. I have never swapped brass without dropping the original powder charge first and working back in to it. JohnnyK.
     
  8. britz

    britz Well-Known Member

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    With my 300 I just use one brand of brass now. With my 22-250 I use several (pmc, Win, rem, Frontier, fed). I try to keep it sepperated by brand and when I am getting real fussy with load development I sort it by weight as well to try to keep the internal case volume as close as possible when doing my load tweeking (narrow the variables so to speak).

    The internal dimensions will affect the pressure formed in your case so it would be foolish to assume that a very hot load in brand x brass would shoot similarly to brand y brass.