How To Tune A Bow

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by Len Backus, Mar 6, 2008.

  1. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    I'd like to make this a sticky thread if we get enough good tips on the topic.
     
  2. Idaho_Elk_Huntr

    Idaho_Elk_Huntr Well-Known Member

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  3. trebark

    trebark Well-Known Member

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    Len:
    That's a tough question. I've hunted with a bow for 17 years. I do all the work on my bow. I've also helped to tune the bows of many of my friends. Each one is individual. There are so many variables.

    For a reference, I use a book entitled "On Target....Tuning Your Broadheads and yoru entire Hunting Bow System" It has great illustrations of paper tuning and how to correct the arrow flight errors.

    Suffice to say, after you've shot an arrow threw paper, the first thing to correct is porposing (tail high or low tear in the paper). Second, correct for fish-tailing (left or right tear). Porposing is fairly easily corrected. It's the fish-tailing that's tough to cure sometimes.
     
  4. telkev

    telkev Active Member

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    Tuning a bow properly is going to be different for each individual bow. The first thing you have to do is to pick the right arrow with the correct spine stiffness for the draw length, draw weight, and broadhead weight. If you have a compound bow that has a solo-cam, tuning the bow can be shortened by at least 350 curse words, not saying 2 cam bows cannot be tuned, but require tuning regularly as strings stretch, etc. Next, arrow rest selection cannot be left out. If you use a whisker biscuit, a perfect hole through paper will give you the best results. A drop away rest can be tuned with a perfect to slight tail-high tear for best results. Drop away rests are the new rave, but you are also adding another moving part that has to perform flawlessly each and every shot. Launcher style rests will usually perform best with a slight tail-high setting. As long as you have an arrow with the correct spine, and have good enough form for repeatability, adjusting for tail left for right should be corrected easily by adjusting the rest to the left or right. Usually this spot will be slightly to the left of true center of the string.
    Arrows on the other-hand are like factory loads. Some of them don't shoot worth crap. Solid carbon arrows have the advantage of not bending and being lighter than aluminum. However they are not as straight and spine strength is not as consistent. If money is no object, the best of both worlds is the Easton ACC arrows.
    Having a bow prefectly in tune will not always produce the tightest groups down range. Adjusting the tail-tear slightly may improve consistency down range and improve your confidence level too boot.
    Hope somebody found this helpfull.
     
  5. Michael Eichele

    Michael Eichele Well-Known Member

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    Len,

    Let me know what type of info you would like and I can get you some threads. Albiet SOME may be plagarized. Sorry I havent been around here lately! Been shooting LOTS of archery. I just got back from the range after shooting 341 out of 360 points at 90 meters. If I can learn to do that in competition instead of just practice those scores would be serious contention on an international level.
     
  6. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    Michael, that's some serious shooting!

    As to this thread, I guess I am just wanting to have a guide on How-to that can become a serious reference.
     
  7. squirrelduster

    squirrelduster Well-Known Member

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    Bow tuning

    The two biggest things that I have found that have improved my groups are buying a good drop away rest and the second was Blazer vanes. We changed my brothers vanes to blazer and it shrunk the group in half or more.
    Learn how to shoot a release. I bought one from WalMart as a backup after my brother lost his and couldn't hunt the rest of the weekend. 9 bucks on sale. It is as good as my $90.00 unit. A release will get rid of a lot of tuning issues if you are shooting fingers or a tab.
    You don't need the newest fastest ferrarri of the bow world just make sure you have really good technique and the arrows are matched to the bow. Practice a lot, not just before deer season. Find something else to hunt. We hunt ground squirrels and are pretty good out to 40 yards on the rodents so a shot at a deer is not a problem. Hogs are another really good practice quarry.
    Spend more money on your broadheads to make sure you have the best you can afford. they fly better and once they hit they WORK.
     
  8. little black 243

    little black 243 Well-Known Member

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    I am by no means a pro but Ive tinkered for a little while the first thing to check for a consistant shooting bow is correct draw length. All to often weve had guys come into the shop shooting a bow thats too long. Correct draw length will help on a number of levels, form, steadyness, constant anchor point. Second is form but that takes more than just reading! most people can tune a bow and there are hundreds of ways to do it. Paper tuning is an awesome tool. All bows are funny, like rifles and ammo gotta find the sweet spot that it shoots best for that bow!
     
  9. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    Write an Article

    Lots of good ideas.

    I would love it if someone would write an article about how to do this. If you are interested email me.
     
  10. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    Here is a Tuning Tips PDF file from Easton, courtesy of "old_heli_logger"

    Easton Tuning Guide