How to find optical center?

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by dandeployed, Mar 18, 2008.

  1. dandeployed

    dandeployed Member

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    From what I've read, scopes give the best performance in the center of the lense. What is the best way to get the crosshairs in the center of the lense?

    I was planning on counting clicks and then dividing the number by 2, but I couldn't find a definite stop before the screw began to back out.

    I have ZEE rings, so I will use the rings to get as close to zeroed in as possible.

    I hope what I'm asking makes sense. Any help will be appreciated,

    Dan
     
  2. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    I don't think that optical center is an issue on a top notch scope. Most are clicking many MOA to reach out a bit and have no problems.

    Others use hold overs towards the bottom of the scope. What is most important is that there is enough elevation adjustment to make the longest shots that are practicable for you.
     

  3. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    As usual MR. Roy is correct. However, to answer your question you should set the scope in a shoe box(or similar) that has a "V" cut symmetrically into both sides. Then spin the scope, if the cross hairs wobble move them till they just spin with the cross staying centered. Make since? If not maybe someone else can explain a little better. By the way, what kind of scope is it? I have never seen a good scope's turrets spin till they loosen and maybe come off!
     
  4. dandeployed

    dandeployed Member

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    Thanks for the info.

    The scope is a Sightron SII 3-9x42. It may not have come all the way out, but it just "felt" like it was near the end of its threads and the sound of the clicks became very faint.
     
  5. Hutt

    Hutt Member

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    Place scope objective squarely against a mirror. There will be two sets of crosshairs present. Dial in elevation and windage until they perfectly overlap and become one visual crosshair again.