How much pressure on the cheek weld?

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by 10point, Nov 3, 2013.

  1. 10point

    10point Active Member

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    I place sufficient shoulder pressure on the butt stock to stabilize the rifle but not to restrict the horizontal recoil of the rifle. I have an adjustable cheek weld. Should the pressure on the cheek weld be similar to the pressure on the stock butt? I have heard that the cheek weld should support the entire weight of my head. I am concerned that placing the entire weight of my head on the cheek weld would alter the natural horizontal recoil of the rifle and change the point of impact.
     
  2. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Just enough to be comfortable and keep the butt from slapping your face.

    The most essential element really is just being consistent with however you mount the rifle but I can tell you from experience that a very loose cheek weld can end up being painful.
     

  3. mrb1982

    mrb1982 Well-Known Member

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    I am gonna follow this one because I am curious also
     
  4. varmintH8R

    varmintH8R Well-Known Member

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    My personal experience has been that the best results come from a cheek weld that is comfortable and repeatable without a lot of thought. For me, that is a light to moderate mount without turning my head overtop of the cheekpiece.

    My opinion would be to get in a position that is comfortable and intuitive and see what your results are, and then do some experimenting. I personally cant make the "heavy cheek weld" work for me.
     
  5. 375fan

    375fan Well-Known Member

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    Snug, remember you want to be able to see your bullets impact, too loose and recoil will cause you to lose sight picture as rifle is recoiling. Also you want to maintain consistent eye to scope alignment with every shot, too loose/tight will have effect on accuracy especially as ranges get longer. Too loose/tight cheekweld will not be comfortable, if your not comfortable there is a chance you will not be fully focused on making a shot.
    As Wildrose said , getting smacked in the cheek is no fun.
     
  6. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Hat tip to the man that said, what I said, even better than I.gun)
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2013
  7. jcvibby

    jcvibby Non-Profit Sponsor

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    What you want to do is this,

    get behind your rifle, close your eyes, don't even worry about scope/sight picture because that will screw it up,

    and then imagine you had to fall asleep in that position, rest your head like you wanted to fall asleep

    bingo, no more no less.

    At least that is what the Scout sniper school instructors teach. But what do they knows
     
  8. BackpackHunter

    BackpackHunter Member

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    Like Jcvibby said, approximately the same amount of pressure you put on a pillow when you lay on it to sleep.
     
  9. bill123

    bill123 Well-Known Member

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    I worked on this for a long time, altering cheek & trigger hand pressure, taking notes after each shooting session. I finally settled on "head on pillow pressure" & light pull w/ my trigger hand.

    Having said that, I don't think that its about a right or wrong pressure. It's about repeatability. You could probably do just about everything the "wrong" way but if you can repeat the "wrong" way perfectly every time, you will get a consistent POI.

    I settled on "pillow" pressure because its something I'm familiar with. Who doesn't instantly know what it feels like to put your head on a pillow?
     
  10. 10point

    10point Active Member

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    Thanks for all of the good advice.
    I will try several of them and see which one feels the most natural and repeatable. I know there's strength in the statement that says practice practice practice but sometimes practicing the wrong way takes more time to correct than understanding the right way.

    I was watching a television show regarding snipers and long-range shooting. These were Marine sniper type shooters. There was going to be a contest the following day and ending statement was go work on your cheek weld tonight. It sounded as if the cheek weld was as important as The trigger pressure.
     
  11. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    10point,

    Not to be nit picky or a dink but :)

    You have an adjustable cheek piece.

    Cheek weld is the position and pressure of the cheek on that cheek piece.

    I've found that consistent small groups come from a consistent cheek weld and consistent rifle butt to shoulder position and pressure.

    Shoulder pressure on the butt as is 'loading the bipod' provides for consistent observation of hits. Last Friday I verified drops 2 502, 644, 977 and 1215. The 1 shot needed @ 502 was @ a 10 degree down angle, 644 was -4 degrees, 977 was 2 degrees and 1215 was -4 degrees.

    502 shot was spot on first shot. 644 was a bit low first shot. A couple of clicks up and second shot was spot on. @ 977 I could spot the first shot but saw dust in the wind from the rock target. I got a little more serious and still couldn't spot the POI on the second shot but saw that I was hitting a couple IPHY low. Made the adjustment, paid really strict attention to the rear bag and shoulder pressure. Rifle simply laid there and easily saw the POI. The 1215 yard first shot was a bit high. Clicked down a couple and dusted the small target and was able to watch it disappear.

    The nifty thing was that due to the position of the 1215 yard target the shot was taken left handed. The experience of the 977 yard shot made me pay attention to cheek weld and shoulder pressure.

    Note that I use a solid bipod and loading the bipod is not a consideration but consistent butt/shoulder pressure is.

    Cheek weld pressure and position is whatever is comfortable and consistent for the shooter.

    I don't understand the pillow thing as my entire head weight is on the pillow.

    Also I don't use adjustable cheek pieces and only a soft touch of the cheek is necessary to get a full view through the scope.

    Just sayin'
     
  12. Nimrodmar10

    Nimrodmar10 Well-Known Member

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    Forty-something years ago, my Marine PMI constantly said "Wood on wood ladies." Constantly. He seemed to think that a solid cheek weld was very important. The lesson stuck. My cheek weld is solid enough that I normally give the stock a good thump with my cheek to settle it into the rear bag just before I use the other piece of advice drilled into my brain by that DI: BRASS, Breath, Relax, Aim, Slack, Squeeze.I wrote that one on the base of my thumb so it would be the last thing I'd see when I laid my cheek on the stock.

    My problem is that almost none of the factory hunting stocks have a comb high enough to get a solid cheek weld and have your eye lined up with the scope, especially a quality long range scope on high mounts. I have to put some type of riser on all my hunting rifles.
     
  13. 10point

    10point Active Member

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    I tried adding height to the stock with aftermarket products but found them to flexible to produce a consistent cheek weld. I then progressed to a custom stock from McMillan with an adjustable cheek weld.