heres a remington rifle question for ya!

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by mrbigtexan, Apr 12, 2012.

  1. mrbigtexan

    mrbigtexan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    266
    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2009
    why does remington insist on putting a pressure point built into their stock so that there barrels are'nt free floating.
     
  2. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,992
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Some rifles. especially those with light, hunting weight barrels, shoot better with a bit of forend pressure. They may not, if 5 or 10 groups are fired. This is from the "old days" when only one or two shots was needed. Now, it doesn't matter whether it's a #2 contour or a MTU, shooters want 5 shot (minimum) groups from their hunting rifles, light barreled or not. I graduated from MCCs' 2 yr. gunsmithing program 19 yrs. ago. Went, really, to learn stockmaking (by hand, from a blank), already had 17 yrs. experience as a job shop machinist. (also, learned what was appropriate on a custom rifle and what is not!) The stockmaking instructor retired in '95 or '96 (that gives you an idea of his approximate age). He had learned to make stocks from his father as a teenager. He was, also, a gunsmith school graduate from an earlier time (at a older established school. He ,basically, had two life times of experience). He insisted on 7lbs. of forearm pressure on a 'hunting' weight barrel, which is what we were building (what else would you use a Mauser '98/'03 Springfield and a $300 fitch of english walnut for?) He would admit that some rifles shot better with a bit more or less forarm pressure, but he wanted to start with that 7lbs. and work from there (evidently, he had seen more success with pressure than without). The pressure point could always be removed, if preformance wasn't 'up to par',,,,,,, but you couldn't put wood back, and in that day, glass was frowned upon as amateur. Precise hand work was encouraged and required. Short answer,, it takes less time to take it out than put it back. And it may be beneficial for those who only need 2rds.
     

  3. chas3stix

    chas3stix Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    207
    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2011
    My Rem Mod 700 30-06 ADL has a B&C stock and requires a barrel pressure point to shoot its best. Shotgun patterns without it.
     
  4. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,608
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2010
    Shortgrass is right.

    But, I also wonder if they've determined that most folks like a "close fit and finish" between their stock and barrel.

    As such, it may be easier to manage clearance, especially with wood stocks, by controlling the point of contact rather than waiting for wood to fully cure.

    Does anybody know if they do it on their fiberglass or tuperware stocks?

    It wasn't present on my Sendero. ...then again, the sling mount screw was protruding and vibrating on the bottom of the barrel. ...nothing a dremmel can't fix.

    -- richard
     
  5. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,992
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Blanks I used/use have a minimum of 8yrs. natural (not kiln) drying time. The instructor recommended no less than 6yrs. I have several in storage in my shop that are 15+years old. When I buy one it sits a mininum of 18 months in my shop before any work begins. Allows it to stabilize to the local climate. Factories don't have that luxury. Tupperware Rem. stocks have little plastic "tits" in the end of the barrel channel.
     
  6. Edd

    Edd Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,395
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2011
    Who was your instructor?
     
  7. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,992
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    PM sent
     
  8. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,375
    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2005
    I suspect Richards idea is very likely. Using kiln dried unseasoned blanks, the pressure tabs keep the rifles looking good on the shelf. The shortcoming of pressure points is changing pressures change point of impact. Everything changes pressures on the forend. A tight sling, temperature, humidity, different rests. If you've ever put a columator in a bore and looked through the scope, it's amazing how little pressure it takes to move things around.

    If you have a sporter with pressure points, shoot it accordingly. Always check your zero before you hunt. Try to shoot with consistent pressure on the forend. Be aware a tight sling, hard rest, or bipod could throw shots. If you want to shoot off a bipod, test the rifle off a bipod.

    Our needs are different then they were before. We're shooting long range. A one minute shift in point of impact is not okay for what we do. Our rifles are built accordingly. We use rigid barrel contours, rigid stocks impervious to the elements, and we free float the barrels.
     
  9. Gene

    Gene Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,326
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    I once removed the pressure point on a Rem 700, .257 Roberts to free float the barrel. It shot much worse. Did not take long to glass the point back in. Remington knows what they are doing, (sometimes).
     
  10. tuck2

    tuck2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    94
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    I got my first centerfire rifle in 1952 and over the years have used various brands and caliber bolt action rifles. A few shot small groups out of the box but most of them shot smaller groups after the action was glass bedded and the barrel freefloated. The trigger pull weight was also adjusted down to about three pounds.