help please

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by william101, Dec 30, 2010.

  1. william101

    william101 Well-Known Member

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    Im buying a savage predator rifle for coyotes, what would you guys recomend, shooting sticks (what kind and brand) or a harris bi-pod, and if a harris bi-pod what size? thanks for any help.
     
  2. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    I run both. Harris Bibod mounted on the gun (the shorter one ((8-14 inches or whatever it is)) for shooting prone) and shooting sticks.

    I call sitting with the rifle supported on the sticks. Sticks are way more versatile for a couple of reasons.........1st, we never know exactly where the coyote is gonna come from, nor exactly when/where he'll present a good standing still shot opportunity; trying to move the rifle 45 or even 90 degrees is way easier with sticks than a tall bipod, especially when the ground is way uneven and you're sitting in the brush.....sitting (vs laying prone) gives us way more field of view and is simply faster to get the rifle on a moving unpredictable target. 2nd reason.......If the only shot we have is a close range but moving shot, we're able to pan the gun side to side way easier on sticks than with a bipod. 3rd reason..........elevation adjustment is way easier with sticks because all we usually have to do is slide the sticks forward or rearward on the stock (don't have to try and adjust the height of the bipod legs).

    Down side is that they do take a little getting used too and require somewhat frequent practice to be able to connect at distances beyond 200 yds regularly (for me anyway).

    If the coyote is unaware of my position and I have time/enough cover to allow some movement; I'll lay down prone and use the short bipod that's already on the rifle. I much prefer to use the steadiness of the prone position if the coyote is around 200 yds or further, and the sticks are easily discarded when I need to move down into prone.........trying to shorten the legs of a bipod before we can get prone is simply too noisy and takes more movement and time.

    The things I am mentioning may not make a whole lot of sense until you've called in a handful of coyotes in varying types of country/cover.

    I really like the harris (don't recall the model) that has spring loaded extension capability rather than the standard spring loaded closing type. The type S swivel is highly recommended too, because the ground is never level when you need it.
     

  3. william101

    william101 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the helpful info. What kind of or make of shooting sticks do you recomend? Thanks again.
     
  4. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the helpful info. What kind of or make of shooting sticks do you recomend? Thanks again.

    I originally started with a tall bipod which held the gun great, but too noisly and cumbersome to move if the coyote showed up at an odd angle or at an elevation I wasn't set up for. It was nearly impossible to lower/raise the bipod legs without getting "busted" when a coyote was coming in and looking for the slightest movement. When they stop and offer a shot, we've only got a couple seconds usually before they are on the move again (either still coming in or leaving in a hurry)

    Over the years, I've tried a few varieties of sticks. Started with the original Stony Point Steady Stix..........there was no way to keep the legs from spreading out on their own, especially if it was icy or the ground was frozen and really hard.

    Next I tried a simple pair of crossed wood slats held together with a bolt/nut. I put nails in the bottom of the wood to "stab" into the ground......still unpredicable on when they would decide to splay out and drop your gun on the ground (I use both hands for calling and glassing).

    Third, a pair of 36" long 1/2" thick oak dowels.........Bolt/nut is about 6" from the top. About 1/2 way down the sticks I drilled a hole through both of them and attached a length of snare cable with stops on each end to keep the legs from spreading out too far accidentally.

    Deciding on the length of cable can be tricky, depends on if you call level ground or sit facing downhill or uphill. The legs will now only spread so far, so any other adjustment for elevation (downward at least) needs to be done by sliding the sticks forward and backwards along the rifle stock. I usually call sitting facing downhill to some extent, so my sticks are just a little tall for level ground. But they will never slip or spread or drop my gun at the worst possible moment. The folded bipod or the sling keeps the rifle from sliding out of the notch, and the legs won't spread beyond the pre-determined cable length.

    I can attach a picture of them at a later time if you're interested.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2010
  5. william101

    william101 Well-Known Member

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    That would be great, thanks for help!
     
  6. coyotezapper

    coyotezapper Well-Known Member

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    I have tried most all and I like the Vern Howey sticks. ( coyote hunting application, I use others for other types of hunting ) You can find them here.

    Product Listing Shooting Sticks=
     
  7. Grumulkin

    Grumulkin Well-Known Member

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    I made my own shooting sticks. I cut a couple of pretty straight willow branches off my trees, attached the one to the other with parachute cord and wrapped the ends where the rifle sits with gaffer's tape. I cut them so the length is perfect for shooting stuff on the back 50 whilst sitting on my 5 gallon bucket.

    They work well but the best part is, if they ever break or are lost, I'm only out maybe 50 cents.
     
  8. MHO

    MHO Well-Known Member

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    I love the harris bipods. A far as size, that depends on what position of shooting you prefer. I have tried just about every stick and bipod. Spend the little extra on a harris. They are well worth it. They are better built than the stoney point. Just my opinion.