Help: New shooter looking for decent rifle

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by McDewbie, May 16, 2011.

  1. McDewbie

    McDewbie Active Member

    Messages:
    31
    Joined:
    May 16, 2011
    Hello there,
    I'm going to be getting my gun license soon and am hoping to get into long range shooting and hunting. the problem is I don't know a whole lot about guns themselves. therefor I don't really know a whole heck of a lot about what gun I should be getting. I have shot before, when i was young enough to not need a license, and am proficient up to around 250- 325 meters. for the hunting part I live in an area where the smallest animal (without going into raccoon sized animals) are white tail deer, but I also plan on hunting elk. I' am a student so money is kind of an issue so please nothing more than 1200. I'd like to be able to shoot out to 1kilo eventually (maybe more). last stipulation is that I do live in Canada so if you know its a weapon unobtainable here please dont suggest it.
    Thanks in advance, Evan
     
  2. Bullet bumper

    Bullet bumper Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,042
    Joined:
    May 20, 2009
    The Japanese made Howa is a good buy , the barrels are hammer forged on German made machines and shoot very well I have found. Howa, Howa Rifle, Howa 1500 Rifle, Howa Guns, Howa Accessories Buy the one you like in a 30-06 and you are good for White tail to Elk no worries and can handle a Grizzly if required . Also you can push a 308 Match bullet fast enough to shoot targets at 600 to 700 yards.Don't be put off by the nay sayers that will nock thesse rifles just because they are not US made. They are still good value for the money.
     

  3. Outlaw6.0

    Outlaw6.0 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,007
    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    My father has a Vanguard/Howa in .243, it's a great shooter for sure & has some nice features.

    Lets break it down a little, not in any particular order:

    1) Remington 700 LA/SA= Good usable action, decent trigger & generally accuate, the stock is terrible & needs to be replaced, every aftermarket part imaginable.

    2) Savage 110/10- 112/12= Generally doesn't need to be "trued" due to the action design (read cost savings), the trigger (for me) has been great if you can get used to it. Well known for "out of the box" accuracy, can be re-barreled at home (with proper tools), well priced rifle for the performance. Bolt lift is somewhat stiffer than Remmies ($8.00 fix), I don't really like the extractors but they work ok.

    3) Howa 1500= Great extractor, good action/barrel, OK trigger. Aftermarket is somewhat lacking but catching up as fast as can be expected. IMHO it's kinda like an extra wheel, we've already got Rem, Win, WBY, Savage & a plethora of established custom actions... why bother with the new kid on the block? anywho.....

    4) Win 70= Great action (CRF), very strong, ok triggers, don't know about their barrels. pretty pricy (YMMV) for a beginner (I don't have a lot of experience here).



    Do a LOT of reading here, there is a TON of great information on this topic. All of the above can be had in nearly any cartridge combo imaginable so it's up to you.
     
  4. McDewbie

    McDewbie Active Member

    Messages:
    31
    Joined:
    May 16, 2011
    I was looking at the Browning X-Bolt, know anything about that? and, not trying to sound like a novice, but what do you mean by trued?
    Thanks, Evan
     
  5. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,226
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2006
    rem sendero and leup
     
  6. kc

    kc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    970
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2003
    I am sure this is your first rifle for long range hunting, I like my Remingtons but out of the box dead accurate? go for a Savage bolt action..
    they are the #1 out of the box accurate rifle, and the next purchase you MUST buy a good scope.
    Loupo, Nikon,Burris. do not skimp on the scope, but you don't need to break the bank.
    if you are just Deer Hunting, Nikon for the money is worth it... This scope must last for many years you cant have a scope fail during hunting season..this has happened to many hunters
    and I am one of them..ask around, the three mentioned is in my opinion the makes who have never failed me, the prices are ok but do not buy junk or a scope with a bad warentee.
     
  7. McDewbie

    McDewbie Active Member

    Messages:
    31
    Joined:
    May 16, 2011
    my grandpa gave me a leupold mrk 4 long range/ tactical 4.5-14x50so im good for the scope. The only problem with the savage guns is that the outdoor outfitters near me doesnt sell them, they said the nearest place that does is on the mainland ( i live on an island) and a fairly lengthy drive. I'm trying to talk to the shipper/ receiver here to order one for me though. and about ammo, I know that if your trying to shoot at like exceptionally long ranges you'd want to make your own, but I can't do that, any thoughts what is a good out of the box ammo?
    Thanks, Evan
     
  8. McDewbie

    McDewbie Active Member

    Messages:
    31
    Joined:
    May 16, 2011
    oh yeah, Will I want a short or long action? or is that just a preference not an overall quality thing?
    Thanks, Evan
     
  9. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,608
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2010
    Short or Long Action is generally determined by which cartridge you shoot.

    e.g. 243, 308 are short action while 270, 30-06 are long action

    Pick a cartridge suitable for the kind of hunting you want to do and that'll narrow down your options a good bit.

    A 30-06 will do the job. But, I consider it to be on the low end for Elk, although they've been killed at long range with smaller rifles. It would not hurt for you to pack a little more punch. A muzzle break will tame the recoil and you certainly don't want to develop a flinch from shooting too much gun.
     
  10. deerhunterjj

    deerhunterjj Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    95
    Joined:
    May 21, 2011
    The x-bolt is a fine carry around rifle. Its really light fit and finish is excellent on the one i had. The 60 degree bolt throw was nice for a follow up shot if one was needed. mine was a 270wsm and recoil was fairly stout because of the weight of the rifle. It was picky on factory ammo also. The only load it would shoot MOA was federal 140s if i remember right. I would not recommend it for a new shooter in the 270wsm or larger caliber. Even with the great recoil pad if you shoot it much you could develop a flinch really easy.
    Just my 2 cents If your wanting to shoot longrange/hunt i would look at something with a heavy barrel. you dont have to go full tilt bull barrel. I would go with a 7mm mag or 300win mag because of the wanting to hunt elk. But i shot a few deer with the 270wsm and with the nosler accubond bullet that 270wsm is nothing to over look. It sure made a mess out of the deer i shot with it. If the bullet is placed where it needs to be that 270wsm will do the job with out a problem. Which is the case with any caliber you decide to go with. Ammo for the wsm is an issue to find at some places so thats another thing to think about as well. Availability of the ammo caliber you go with. Nothing worse then season rolls up on ya and you have to order ammo that's for the birds.
    As for rifles again this is my 2 cents. Remington sendero. The howa 1500 like the above post said it is a good rifle. Hard to beat it for the money. Weatherby vanguard sub MOA which is a howa built gun. Which ever brand of rifle you decide to go with one of the most important things to go by is what feels best to you. Look at a few shoulder get the feel for it and you will find that one of them is going to shoulder like it was made for ya. I would also recommend finding a 22lr and shoot a lot of rounds if you havent shot in awhile. It brings back and tunes back in the fundamentals of shooting that will be applied to the centerfires. Hope this answers some of your questions.
     
  11. captainjoe

    captainjoe Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    67
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    I just went through an extensive debate on which gun and caliber for my recent purchase. I did the following:

    1. I have always been a Remington man, but I went with Savage. Out of the box, they boast very good accuracy at a very good price point. If the long range side of your hunting doesn't ever become a big focus, you can just stick with it as a stock rifle. Otherwise, you can upgrade it yourself without a gunsmith as your preferences develop. In fact, I bought a new unfired Savage without the accustock because I plan on changing the stock out anyhow, so I saved $200 which I can put into a stock I really like. I'm on a tight budget, so I'll shoot it a bit and every year put a bit more money into the gun, crafting and shaping it into my ultimate long range gun.

    2. I went with the 300 win mag. I am a big 30-06 fan, but I wanted something with a bit more punch out past 500 yards. This caliber is economical to shoot because ammunition is easy to find and buy. Technically, this cartridge will go as far as you most likely want to ever go. Here is a link to a guy on these forums that has just shot his 300 win mag at 1 mile: http://www.longrangehunting.com/forums/f17/hit-mile-mark-ruger-m77-300-win-mag-72755/

    My 300 win mag is my first gun to start pushing the envelope for me in greater yardages. After I have done that, I will probably explore the 338 Edge or some other caliber at that stage. Then again, the 300 win mag may be all the gun that I ever want. It could be the same for you.

    Bottom-line is that you don't have to spend a lot of money to get started. Sounds like you already got a decent set of optics, so you put that on a Savage or even a Remington, you are on your way. There are many options after you get started and that's half the fun. Hope this helps!
     
  12. RDM416

    RDM416 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    700
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2005
    Since you do not plan to handload in the near future you might consider going with the 308 or 30-06 as others have suggested. Ammo is always available for both and inexpensive, with the 308 being the least expensive. If you were to go with one of the magnums you will be paying so much for ammo that you will not be able to afford much trigger time.
     
  13. McDewbie

    McDewbie Active Member

    Messages:
    31
    Joined:
    May 16, 2011
    I went up shooting twice since I first posted the message, once with a friend and the other time with my grandpa. I got a first shot hit at 275 yards on a beer can with my grandpa's 7mm rem mag at the end of the second trip, so I'm not as squeaky now. since I got the shipper/ receiver here to confirm he can order savage arms' guns i have been looking at the 11(1) long range hunter, in either the 308 or 7mm rem mag. RDM, you were saying the magnum ammo costs more, so maybe I'll go with the .308. Can anyone think of any of the major things I have missed asking? I'd also like to thank everyone here, everything everyone has said so far has been a great help, its rare to find that on the internet.
    Thanks, Evan
     
  14. pepprdog

    pepprdog Member

    Messages:
    5
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2004
    You should enjoy the Savage in 308!! The accutrigger is, to me, as good a stock trigger system out there. With an accustock you would have a very solid package not needing much of anything for the future expense wise..... except ammo.
    I hope your luck is as good as mine; Weather Warrior 300WSM.