Help getting setup

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Vedak, Nov 19, 2013.

  1. Vedak

    Vedak Member

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    Hey guys,

    So I've reloaded twice now, and decided I wanted to piece together my own system. These are the things I have so far, what else would you say I need?
    I'll be reloading mainly 40S&W for my Glock and 308win for my Savage 10 FCP-K. I plan to pick up a 454 Casull, 338LM, 44Mag, 45ACP, 25-06, and 30-378WM down the road. Also have an AR build that's slow in progress.
    So Far everything feels complete, but I wasn't sure if I was missing anything essential

    RCBS Rock Chucker Single Stage (Borrowed from a friend until I get the Forster Co-Ax)
    Forster Nat'l Match Bullet Seater
    Forster FL Sizer
    Forster Neck Sizer
    Forster Stuck Case Remover
    RCBS Chargemaster
    MTM Loading Trays
    Satern Funnel
    Forster Original Case Trimmer
    Dillon Flip Tray
    Forster Priming Tool
    Harbor Freight Digital Calipers
    Lyman 308win Case Gauge
    Dillon 40S&W Case Gauge
    RCBS Deburring Tool
    LEE Primer Pocket Cleaner
    Imperial Sizing Wax
    LEE Carbide 4 pc Dies for 40S&W
    RCBS Flashole Deburring tool
    Frankford Arsenal Tumbling kit w/ Walnut and Corn media
    Frankford Arsenal Bullet puller
    Barnes Reloading Manual
    Nosler Reloading Manual
    Lyman Reloading Manual
    Sierra Reloading Manual
     
  2. farout

    farout Well-Known Member

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    Nov 21, 2011
    Can I come over to your house to reload? lol

    Might want to upgrade the bullet puller someday. Using one of the hammer things is a pain. They make one that fits in your press and use collets that match the bullet caliber. These are great if you are pulling lots of bullets ( 20 or so).

    Also there is an Imperial graphite media for lubing just the necks. This works great if either full sizing with the wax or if you want to just necks size bottleneck cases.
     

  3. varmintH8R

    varmintH8R Well-Known Member

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    Dec 12, 2011
    Two things I see that to me are very valuable:

    #1. A way to measure headspace (avoid over sizing, measure shoulder bump). Hornady makes a kit as do some others.

    #2. A way to measure the distance of a loaded round to the lands of the rifling (for long guns). Hornady and Sinclair both make gauges to do this. Get a bullet comparator too to measure OAL to the ogive of the bullet.

    Aside from that, you've got a great set-up!

    Also, very much like your "going to get" list!:D
     
  4. varmintH8R

    varmintH8R Well-Known Member

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    Also, may want to hunt down a gently used set of Mitutoyo or Starrett digital calipers. IMO very much worth it vs the Harbor Freight variety.
     
  5. Vedak

    Vedak Member

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    haha sure, once everything is setup.

    I was looking into those bullet pullers also. The FA Kinetic puller was just a quick purchase early on. But the press ones make more sense.

    Yes, I read about that graphite lube on here a while back and totally forgot about it. Thanks!
    Thank you,

    I just ordered the Hornady Comparator, headspace kit, and overall length gauge.


    The HF one has been very acurate for me. BUT the Mitutoyo has been on my purchase list, just not at the top of it.
     
  6. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    One thing you might want to consider for the 40 S&W is a roll sizer. Their chambers are not round, but actually eliptical. Most dies don't get the case exactly round, and they will hang up going into the chamber. I see them every now and then on Ebay. It maybe also be able to size the 45acp as well, but can't say for sure. I like the old Lyman "M" series dies for cast bullets in the 44 mag and similar shaped rounds.

    I also see that your neck sizing a little bit. One of the most usefull tools I've ever bought is a set of small hole gauges. They also are handy when working onnthe rifle itself. Calipers are not really precise for precision measurments in bores. Also I'd recommend purchasing a one inch micrometer, and learn to use it.

    One of the cheapest aids you can get is a note book! Learn to keep a log book, and you'll save money and time.
    gary
     
  7. varmintH8R

    varmintH8R Well-Known Member

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    All of the above is GREAT advice.
     
  8. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    I have no idea what small hole gauges cost right now, as the last set I bought was about ten or twelve years ago. I paid a little over thirty dollars for them. The last set I bought were the "D" shaped ones instead of the normal round ones. I can measure the I.D. of a bolt face with these and yet measure anything else I'd normally measure with the round ball type. I have Mitutoyos, B&S, and maybe Starretts. The only thing I like better are Unimics, and they are pretty expensive. Enco seems to have the best price on them, I might add.

    Another issue that's out there, and most folks don't even know it exists is indicator quality. Yes most meet some Federal spec, and at least that's a start. A lot of guys depend on long travel indicators, but most of of them have about 10% backlash in them! Yes they do make jewelled ones, and they are pretty expensive. The better setup is the small "wand" type indicator that will have at the worst case 3% lag built into it. Some dont have any backlash in them. I've owned indicators that read as close as .000020", but these are a specialty item that are used to check gauging. I still own two or three .000050" indicators, but rarely if ever use them anymore. My goto indicators are the .0005" ones, but will use a one tenth one from time to time.
    I recommend the B&S Best Test and the Interrapids.

    I would not buy the typical carbide tipped micrometers. You just don't need them, and the standard faced ones have a better feel. Buy goods once, and never worry. I use mostly Starrett and Lufkins (no longer made), but also own several Brown & Sharpes. One pair of Lufkins I own were made in 1947, and are still very accurate.
    gary
     
  9. Vedak

    Vedak Member

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    Thanks all! I really appreciate the input.
     
  10. Nimrod

    Nimrod Well-Known Member

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    Unless I missed it I don't see a scale, other than the Chargemaster. A good beam scale and a set of check weights would be on my list. I don't completely trust electronic scales or measuring tools either for that matter.

    Bob
     
  11. Vedak

    Vedak Member

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    A friend also let me borrow an rcbs beam scale. But I am looking into a Dillon one for myself.

    I'm surprised no one seems to have any confidence in the Chargemaster. I used it last week, weighed the first 5 throws in a row, all were within .1grain easily- I did this before charging any actual rounds. After that I would measure every 10 rounds. After charging 80 rounds, I randomly checked 30 rounds. All within .1gr

    I will listen to the advice here and pick up a beam scale as well though.

    Is the Dillon one good enough?
     
  12. Nimrod

    Nimrod Well-Known Member

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    That's about the same procedure I use when checking thrown charges. I have 2 beam scales on the bench and I'll check one with the other when I set up. When I'm running max loads I will weigh every 5th. charge twice. When setting up for a new load I have fat fingered the weights more than once, the second scale catches it every time, it seems to happen more often than it used to. I'm sure the Dillon scale is a good one though I've never personally used one.

    It sounds like you are getting off to a great start!

    Bob
     
  13. Vedak

    Vedak Member

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    Thanks Bob,

    I'm finding this activity very fun. I love these little details, it's really helping me with staying sharp in general.

    All these ways to measure things is pretty amazing, I am impressed to say the last by those that invented these tools.
     
  14. Kennibear

    Kennibear Well-Known Member

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    Ditto's on the beam scale. the electronics seem to read a wild one every now and again. Trust my beam scale implicidly and keep it clean! And on a level surface.