Heaviest projectile for 22-250

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by hotshot357, Dec 15, 2013.

  1. hotshot357

    hotshot357 Member

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    What would be the heaviest projectile I can use in my 22-250 savage axis with a 1 in12 twist and a 22inch barrel
     
  2. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    I would guess a 55 grain bullet would be optimum, But barrels are individuals and sometimes break the rules and shoot heaver bullets.

    The 22-250 has enough velocity for the bigger bullets but the twist and the bullet have lots to do with it.

    I used the 52 grain match Kings in Mine and had both 1/4 MOA accuracy and good varmint performance unless I was pelt hunting and then I went to the 50 or 55 grain bullets.

    With the new bullets that are available It would be worth a try to see if the 60 grain bullets would work.

    Hope this helps

    J E CUSTOM
     

  3. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    I've shot a few .60" groups with 60 grain Hornaday #2275's. They have a B/C of .27. Never did any serious load development, but think I couple get the in the half inch area without too much trouble.
    gary
     
  4. hotshot357

    hotshot357 Member

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    Thanks some say you can go 63-65 grain but I don't. Think it would stabilized, I use 55grain vmax and seirra 55 grain sp with imr4064 and get 1/4 or less at 100yards really good for a cheap rifle
     
  5. Ring

    Ring Well-Known Member

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    best BC of any -60gr bullet is the new 53gr vmax with a G1 of .290
     
  6. B23

    B23 Well-Known Member

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    I'm a BIG fan of that 53 Vmax bullet. It's the only bullet I shoot out of my 223AI with a 22in. Hart 1-9tw. It does do a number on coyotes! My dad, who is 74, gave one a dirt nap yesterday at just over 300yds with my 223AI and a 53Vmax. :D

    But, I've read mixed reviews on how well they work in a 1-12tw 22-250. Seems that some people get them to shoot real well out of their 22-250 with 1-12's while others don't. I would think a 1-12tw with the launch speeds a 22-250 can produce would be enough twist but maybe for some guns it's not. I'm not sure a 1-12tw would be enough for the 53Vmax in a .223 though.

    If you're looking for a slick little varmint bullet and you can make them shoot in your 1-12tw 22-250, it sure would get my vote. I wouldn't use this bullet if you were saving hides as they tend to open up real fast and make big messy holes.
     
  7. fishwater

    fishwater Well-Known Member

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    I shoot 55 gr. Nosler BT varmint's. I called Nosler and they told me it will stabilize in a 1-14" twist (I shoot a Weatherby Vanguard.)

    I would think with a 1-12' twist you could go slightly heavier, maybe a 60 gr..

    But of course the length of the bullet also matters here, not just the weight..

    The Greenhill formula says that your maximum weight and length for your caliber and twist rate is:

    58 Grains and 0.63" in length, but this is just an estimate.

    By the way, the specs on the Noslers I shoot are;

    55 gr.

    .0810 total length.

    BC 0.267

    These bullets are VERY accurate in my Vanguard..
     
  8. benchracer

    benchracer Well-Known Member

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    The controversy with the 53g VMAX involves whether or not it will work in a 14 twist. Reported results in a 14 twist are mixed. Hornady themselves state that a 12 twist or faster is needed for the 53g VMAX. Note that a minimum velocity is not specified. Velocity has very little effect upon stability. Spend a bit of time playing with a twist calculator and that becomes very clear. Here are two good online calculators:

    JBM - Calculations - Stability

    http://www.bergerbullets.com/litz/TwistRuleAltWP.php

    Both calculators are based on the Miller stability formula, which more closely approximates modern bullet designs than does the Greenhill formula. Note that the JBM calculator accounts for the length of the plastic tip and the Berger calculator does not (which makes sense given that Berger does not make plastic tipped bullets).

    According to the JBM calculator, the 65g SGK will stabilize in a 12 twist. Sierra says a 7 to 10 twist is needed for this bullet. The 63g Sierra will stabilize in a 12 twist according to both Sierra and the JBM calculator. Berger says their 64g bullet requires a 12 twist to stabilize.

    So, in answer to the OP's question, a 12 twist should reach its limit somewhere in the 63 to 65 grain weight range. As has been mentioned by others, bullet length can play just as important a role in whether or not a bullet will stabilize. Plastic tipped bullets can prove to be a bit different in this regard as well.
     
  9. B23

    B23 Well-Known Member

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    Does actual bearing surface have anything to do with what twist is required or is it just overall length of the bullet???

    I ask because the 53Vmax has a very short bearing surface and it's one of those bullets that seems to require more twist than others in its weight class but it also is probably the longest of any of the bullets in its weight class too so maybe length is all that matters.
     
  10. mtntrapper1

    mtntrapper1 Well-Known Member

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    I have a custom 30" heavy barrell 22-250 AI, It has a 1 in 8 twist and shoots 80 grains and down to @ 65 very well. Im having a 220 AI Swift built on a Cooper single shot with a 28" Lilja with a 1 in 7 twist that will shoot 90 Gr Bergers. It will be a great LR varmnt gun.