Harris bipod question

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by winmagman, Dec 27, 2006.

  1. winmagman

    winmagman Well-Known Member

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    I'm about to order another bipod and am wondering about the notched leg model. Can you adjust the legs to any length or are you limited to only the notches? Also can the legs be extended with one hand like the notchless model or does it require two hands becuase of the notches?

    Thanks in advance
    Chris
     
  2. D.P.

    D.P. Well-Known Member

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    Only adjust to the notches. They are nice one hand adjustable and dont slip with heavy guns. The adjust has worked fine with a swivel style and a pod lock.
     

  3. MagMan

    MagMan Well-Known Member

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    The legs on the leg notch model actually spring out so if your a certain distance from the ground it will end up locking in the closest notch.

    I like them better than the standard models.
     
  4. chain

    chain Well-Known Member

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    I got a Harris Bi pod for Christmas, it has the notched legs. I took it out the day after, the thing works fantastic. I will get another for the new project.
     
  5. MagMan

    MagMan Well-Known Member

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    Chain, are you putting a Pod-Loc on that. I'll never own another bipod without one.
     
  6. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Chain, are you putting a Pod-Loc on that. I'll never own another bipod without one.



    [/ QUOTE ]

    Maybe, DS, Roy, Jimm or me can develop a Pod loc kind of thing that doesn't cost so much. Maybe just a couple of things from Home Depot.
     
  7. chain

    chain Well-Known Member

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    I have heard of the Pod locks but I haven't researched them. What do they do?
     
  8. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    It is a lever and a nut that allows you to tighten up the swiveling mechanism so it doesn't swivel. Say you are on ground that is sloping from right to left, then you will cant your rifle on the bipod until you level bubble says it is level and then reach up with your left hand and swing the pod loc lever over to the left and it locks the gun on the bipod so it is level. If you need to shift positions a little, just swing the lever to the right, move the gun over and then go through the process of leveling and locking the bipod again. If you don't have the time for all of that then you can just use the bipod unlocked and hold the gun against the swivel mechanism and watch your leveling device.
     
  9. chain

    chain Well-Known Member

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    I think mine has a round knob tightener type deal on the end,I tightened it up and I don't get any movement.
     
  10. MagMan

    MagMan Well-Known Member

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    BB, someone has already come up with a cheaper version. I'm sure you could do it all for $10.00. I prefer to get actual Pos-Loc's though.
    t-nuts, you can contact them and they will get you the right parts. There isn't anything under bipod locks so try looking under levers.


    Chain, if you use the bubble level thingers bipod locks work slick.
     
  11. winmagman

    winmagman Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys, notched legs it is. Didn't get the swivel model though, shot a regular one with the swivel and didn't much care for it, but it didn't have the pod loc thingy.

    Chris
     
  12. ds

    ds Well-Known Member

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    b.b.

    I had a pod-lock but it was a bit OTT on the .22. I wanted something that would keep the cant firm without totaly locking it. In winter the small standard nut on the Harris leaves a bit to be desired when you want to tighten it with gloves on.

    So I came up with something that works for me - for about 25 cents. The pic shows a plastic finger nut - available anywhere, inside that you place a nut that fits on the small shank diameter of the thread and is held firmly inside the plastic nut. Take the small nut and finger nut off the Harris as per podlock. Next is the important thing - the original Harris finger nut butts up / tightens on the end of the larger threaded shank, this is a small area - not a lot of friction so hard to lock. The reason the podlock works well is that the "locking ring" goes over the larger nut - much more area and friction to lock it. What I did is a half way house - use a washer between the plastic nut (you have to anyway otherwise you destroy the plastic nut) make sure the washer goes over the threaded shank and sits freely on the large nut. Tightening against the nut gives enough surface area / friction to keep the bipod very firm but not totaly locked. As per Harris you can peen the end of the shank to stop the nut falling off.

    The two small rubber washers where the leg springs are stop the metal from gouging the stock - easy to do.

    David.

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    Thats great. One thing I am going to do to my pod loc after hunting season is over is cut the lever down so it is not so long and will do a full turn without hitting the stock.
     
  14. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    A Podloc for a Harris bipod will cost you abut $21.00 plus shipping. So let us say it costs $25.00. It will take you about 15 minutes to install it.

    Here is one more method of making you a nearly free podlock.

    1. Take a scribe and mark the amount of rotation in the knurled knob that tightens down and loosens up the swivel function so when you install the lever it is properly located and will not hit either side before locking or loosening.
    2. Take off the small front locking nut.
    3. loosen the knurled knob until the threaded bolt is not sticking out of the threads of the knob.
    4. Get a 4d or 6d box nail
    5 Take your drill and a very small bit and carefully drill a hole that is centered in the rotation area from item 1 above. The hole should just miss the inside bevel. Change bits and enlargen the hole to the size of the nail.
    6. File or grind off one side of the head of the nail so it is flush with the bevel inside the knurled knob. Also file off the ridge on the underside of the head.
    7. You need to bend the nail head so it will lay flush inside the knurled knob or else you will not be able to get the locking nut back on. Take the nail over to your vise and open the vise up so the shank of the nail falls through but the head catches. Rotate the nail in the vise so that when it bends it will be aligned with the flat edge against the bevel inside the knurled knob.
    Now take a hammer and a small nail punch and strike the nail head directly on top of the shank until you get about the right curvature.

    8. Get your wire cutters and cut the nail point off to a length that will allow it to rotate past the wings of the bipod frame. Grind or file the point smooth.

    9. Insert the nail into the hole and tighten up the knurled knob.

    10. Get some locktite and then tighten up the locking nut.

    11. If your are afraid that elk that are over 1000 yards away will be spooked by the one inch of shiny nail sticking out or if you believe that an invasion by the inhabitants of Sirius the dog star is imminent and you need to be on full tactical alert then you can take some electrical tape and wrap the nail a few times.

    This takes about 15 minutes to accomplish.

    [​IMG]


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