Greybull Scope Question

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by sdkidaho, May 22, 2010.

  1. sdkidaho

    sdkidaho Well-Known Member

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    In the video you see this at one point where John is describing how you can use the range bars to successfully range out to about 500 yards. Granted this graphic in the video is just for explanation purposes, but I'm confused. Are the numbers on the graphic correct?

    [​IMG]

    Elk chest 28" (that's an average - I'm good with that)

    MOA spaces [7] (How is there 7? This is where I am getting lost as I count FIVE to where the highlighted line is, and only 6 total).

    I realize this isn't an important question - I'm just trying to figure out how they use the range bars in that scope.
     
  2. 338reezens

    338reezens Well-Known Member

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    the highlighted bottom line is the "baseline and would not be counted. 28" is from bottom to top of the elk (chest region), not just to where the top line is. if you start at the bottom and count up (not counting the baseline), there is 4. the dead space between the top hash line and the horizontal cross-hair center line is equall to 3 moa. so you will have 7. can also be counted from top. just rember not to count whatever line you are using as the base line. you are counting the distances between the center of each line to the next. hope this help.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2010

  3. sdkidaho

    sdkidaho Well-Known Member

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    That does help! Let me make sure I've got this right. Sorry for the crude picture but it's the best I can do on short notice.

    [​IMG]

    Lets assume the chest area is 18", so going by the formula it would be:

    Wolf Chest [18"]
    divided by
    MOA Spaces [4]
    equals

    4.5 or 450 yards

    Have I got that right?

    Granted, my graphic won't be to scale, but just for the sake of understanding how the range bars work, I think I've got it. Right?
     
  4. JAA

    JAA Active Member

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    Apr 19, 2010
    I wondered the same thing. Looks like you got it now. I wish you could get the Greybull without the range bars. It looks to be too much in the sight picture. He says its only good to 500 yards minus 10 percent give or take. My new rifle is supposed to be done in June and I am going back and forth between Greybull and Huskemaw. I really dont like the range bars, but all my scopes are Leupold. The un-cluttered look of the Huskemaw reticle is more freindly to me, and the scope looks decent but will they be around in 10 years?
     
  5. sdkidaho

    sdkidaho Well-Known Member

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    That is what I'm trying to decide between as well. Of course, I'm no expert so that makes the decision that much harder. I haven't ever done any long range shooting or hunting. John Burns (Greybull guy) summed it up well for me in this:

    I'm that 2nd category. I don't have to shoot something at long range, but if the opportunity presents itself, I'd like to know I could get it done.

    I don't mind the range bars - I really like the idea that if the range finder is inhibited by weather or whatever, I have a second means to get the job done. I'm leaning more and more towards the Greybull scope for that very reason - otherwise the two are quite similar. As for who will still be around, well... I think you summed it up nicely when noting it's a Leupold product. That isn't to say that Huskemaw won't be around as well, but Leupold has it's proven track record, so to speak.

    I'll have to learn more about what affects those long range shots, wind, angle, temp, etc... but I'm confident I can learn what I need to in order to be able to use a good scope like these. Or so I hope. :)

    This was last September, but I hope they do it again - that would certainly make it more enticing for me:
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2010
  6. 338reezens

    338reezens Well-Known Member

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    sdkidaho, you got the general idea now bud. do not assume all dead spaces are the same on each moa reticle. they may be or may not be. if you look at different reticles you would be able to tell how many moa each dead space is. good luck.-----tom
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2010
  7. sdkidaho

    sdkidaho Well-Known Member

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    Very cool - thanks Tom. I assume that the MOA space on each scope would be listed in its documentation when you buy it, so that you know what that scopes spacing is, correct?

    Thanks again - I appreciate the help. Its been a long time since I did any big game hunting and all of that was under 250 yards so this stuff is certainly new.

    Darby
     
  8. dustybrown

    dustybrown Well-Known Member

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    I have one on my 300 rum and its has been great for me. I do wish it went to 20 rather than 14 power. I asked at the time if they were planning on doing this reticle in a 6.5-20 and they said not for now. Its hard for me to see a 20 inch plate at 1000 yards.
     
  9. Don Ward

    Don Ward Well-Known Member

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    Great explanation of the ranging bars. The first line is 3MOA down from the main crosshair (should have added that to the vid).

    The concern about the reticle being too busy is a common question we get from folks who haven't looked through one. The size and thickness of the reticle is exaggerated in the videos and on the web graphics. The whole reticle is smaller and finer in real life, but can be hard to display clearly in video graphics at the real size.

    Once guys get out to the range and look through the scope, those concerns aren't an issue. Even though the need for the bars is rare (it has saved the day in a few bad weather situations), we find ourselves using them to measure with pretty often. If you are out busting rocks and you know you are powdering a rock at 800 yards, you can quickly measure it with the wind and range bars (1 space = 8" (8.376) @ 800 yards) and see if its the size of a grape fruit or a hippo.

    Sighting in is a breeze - take one shot and measure from the aim point to the hit and you can quickly see that you are 4 MOA left and 7.5 MOA low.