Glassing seat?

Discussion in 'Elk Hunting' started by Ycreek, Mar 26, 2014.

  1. Ycreek

    Ycreek Well-Known Member

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    I'm heading to MT on my first Elk hunt in late October. I'm going with a guide (semi-guided) and the area where I'm going is not the greatest. From what I understand, it's going to require a lot of glassing hours. Do you guys use some kind of ground seats? I find the ones with "strap backs" all over the web but it seems that each one either has bad reviews or is too heavy. Do any of yall recommend a certain seat? Do you even use them? Thanks!
     
  2. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    I carry one of these:

    Mossy Oak Inflatable Seat/Cushion - Break-Up 045312: Hunting : Walmart.com

    Usually $10-12 on sale near hunting season. You open the valve, roll them up to squeeze out the air, and they get quite small. Easy to pack, easy to use. You can stow it in your backpack or use the straps on the seat to attach it to the outside of your pack. I don't find it's worth the bulk to carry a different type of seat or cushion.
     

  3. Ycreek

    Ycreek Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Doc. Exactly the type of information I was looking for. I appreciate it.
     
  4. Browninglover1

    Browninglover1 Well-Known Member

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  5. Andy Backus

    Andy Backus Field Editor

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    I've got a bit of a back problem so I pretty much have to use a seat with a back for extended glassing. I've used a Crazy Creek Chair for many seasons (I think they may have been the original inventor of that type of seat) which is just like the Browning chair mentioned above. They make a lighter-weight version that rolls up for easier packing which I'll probably get sooner or later. Now I just strap the chair to the back of my pack.

    I get an added level of stability for glassing by using it too.
     
  6. Ycreek

    Ycreek Well-Known Member

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    Guys. I really appreciate the help. All of this is definitely new to me. I'm a duck hunter but i'm super fired up about the possibility of shooting a big bull. I also need to become a better rifle shot. Thanks again!
     
  7. Timber338

    Timber338 Well-Known Member

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    I always pack in the REI trail stool. lightweight and keeps you off the ground in camp and when i'm out hunting. It does not have any back support, but I don't have any back problems so it works great for me.
     
  8. yobuck

    yobuck Well-Known Member

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    There are a number of foam cushion seats available for this purpose. Most stores like
    a bass pro or cabellas would offer them. My biggest concern would be the actual
    glassing. If youve not experienced any long glassing sessions i strongly suggest you
    practice doing so before the trip. Even with closer distances than you will encounter
    you will establish some important things. First off you will need either a tripod or
    a shooting/walking stick that will support your glasses. Without it you will become arm weary within a very short period. From that point your simply using your eyes to hunt with. Test yourself by seeing how long you can comfortably hold your glasses up to your eyes and you will see what im talking about. The higher the power of the glasses the more you will need a support for them. As a general rule anything over
    about 8x or 10x at most will require a support for good use and especially extended use.