Glass bedding

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by hegster, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. hegster

    hegster Member

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    I just recived A B&C medalist tactical stock for my Edge It has a full length aluminum bedding block. my question is would I need to glass bed the stock for best accuracy potential or is the aluminum bedding block adiquate?
     
  2. Nape.270

    Nape.270 Well-Known Member

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    Yes you need to bedd it.
     

  3. hegster

    hegster Member

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    Thats what I thought but just wnted to clear it up. one other question I have some ceracote finish coming in the mail would it be best to wait untill after I coat the rifle to bed it or would it not make a differance if I bed it now?
     
  4. Nape.270

    Nape.270 Well-Known Member

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    I would wait but thats just me.
     
  5. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    The cart may be getting in front of the horse a bit here buddy.

    I would really advocate that you go shoot it first and see how it does. If it shoots great, don't "fix" it.

    If it sucks, consider bedding it only after ensuring your scope isn't junk, all your screws were tight, you used good ammo, the bolt handle isn't touching the stock, and you are doing your part behind the trigger.

    Bedding isn't and never will be a magical cure for big groups. Properly done it mitigates changes in group center by providing an inert foundation for the barreled action to register in. When its done in conjunction with other things like fitting of a really good barrel, good optics, and carefully prepared ammunition it can yield some really good results, but its one little piece of the puzzle.

    That's it.

    Sometimes you will see the group's size get a bit smalle with bedding alone but don't expect colossal changes that'll move mountains or alter the earth's orbit. You'll have better luck watching paint dry. It's popular to pour a pad under the cylinder portion of the barrel when bedding a rifle and this can have some remarkable results. Understand though that what you did is make up for an action that didn't have sufficient rigidity to start with. It's not that the "bedding" is better its that you now have the receiver under less strain to support that heavy leg hanging off the front.

    Make sense?

    I'll squash this now so I don't end up writing my usual long winded responses that bore everyone to tears.


    Good luck and I hope it works well for you.

    Chad
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2009
  6. hegster

    hegster Member

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    Chad thanks for the response.

    Accuracy is not a problem I have worked up a load that consistantly gives me an ES in the 8-10 fps range and have been consistently shooting between 1-1.5 inches at 300 yards. Im going to take it out to 600 yards this afternoon to see how it shoots at that range. with the results I am seeing would glass bedding it be a waste of time or would it be worth doing. Thanks for all of your responses I have learned A ton from this site its awsome.
     
  7. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    If your holding a 1/2 minute at 300 you have a good rifle and I'd not change a thing. Now, what I mean by 1/2 minute is a little different than what most assume.

    If I take a gun and go shoot a three shot group at 300 yards and I have a 1.5 inch group on the target I really don't have a half minute of angle rifle. (yet) I just have a gun that shot a 1.5" group at 300.

    Even the fat kid has a good day on the basketball court now and then. . .

    [​IMG]

    Now on the other hand if I go to the range with a box of 50 rounds and I shoot a series of 5 shot groups until that ammunition is all gone and they ALL stay within that same 1.5" circle at 300 yards then it's a certainty that chicks are going to ask me for my number and I'm going to get laid more often. (has to be that way. . .)

    That's the difference. If you want to take it one step further you do this a few different times. Once on a hot day, a cold day, and a rainy day and you then compare things. If the bedding is working, you will see almost no shift in group center. (ideally none, but temps and humidity do fiddle with powders a bit so we'll blame them) If stuff starts meandering all over the target, then I'd look at having some work done to the stock.

    This is certainly more work and most don't want to devote the effort, but if you want it done right, that's how you do it. Just think of it as the more effort you put into learning how your equipment works, the better shooter your going to be.

    Good luck and all the best,

    Chad