Glass bedding

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by sooner2601, May 5, 2013.

  1. sooner2601

    sooner2601 Well-Known Member

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    I have a new Howa 1500 varmint and looking for information on glass bedding the stock. It looks like the best thing to do is pillar bed and glass bed but this is where I'm confused. Why is this best to do both than one over the other?
     
  2. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Good question !!!!

    When you bed only, the stock material can compress over time and change the POI and the torque
    on the action screws.

    The pillars make the fit a floor metal to pillar metal to receiver metal fit (Nothing can compress
    with time).

    If you try to pillar only the action will/may not contact the stock and be allowed to shift around.

    The idea of a full pillar bed is first to make the stock fit the action perfectly and stress free so there
    is no flexing/binding of the action and no compression of the stock or the bedding in the areas of
    the action screws.

    When pillar bedding is done properly the rifle is very consistent and will last a long time with minimal
    removal from the stock.

    In most cases the bedding will out last the barrel if done right.

    To me one is not good without the other. Install pillars and bed the action and you are done. A good
    bedding job with pillars will also tell you when a load is changing(Different batches of powder, primers
    or cases) So you can fix the problem instead of chasing non existing issues.

    I completely bed ALL stocks including inserted/V Block composite and laminates.

    This Is just my opinion.

    J E CUSTOM
     

  3. Daveinjax

    Daveinjax Well-Known Member

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    +1 on both to do it right. You can use bedding to make pillars but it can get messy in a hurry. I have done it both ways and much preferred using aluminum pillars but if you don't have pillars and you just have to do it today....knock yourself out :)
     
  4. JASTECH

    JASTECH Active Member

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    Mar 7, 2013
    So it makes your rifle more accurate? This still allows the barrel to move but reduces what? Sorry, I am trying to understand what needs to be done, and properly to you guys high standards. No one out here even does this type of work I don't think so I'll get taken no dout. Glass with Aluminum pillars the best? I will have to sell/trade another rifle to pay for work I think.
    >
    Thanks, JASTECH
     
  5. Daveinjax

    Daveinjax Well-Known Member

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    Do it Yourself for about $70 . There are lots of videos on YouTube and how to post on the web. Tool and material needed are ; Devcon steel or Marine Tex grey , adjustable pillars , kiwi neutral shoe polish , masking tape , modeling clay , small hand chisel , small flat file , and drill bit big enough to drill out for pillars. Watch some videos and read some and do it. I do not recommend using a dremel tool as you can wreck a stock in a heartbeat. Maybe these pictures from Gunsmithing made easy by Bryce M Towsley will help. I think I picked up his book at Walmart in the sporting goods section. I don't do it exactly like he shows but if you followed his instructions you wouldn't go wrong. I included a couple of pictures of the worst bed job I've done in years. It still shoots fine and works.
     

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  6. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Yes it definitely makes a rifle more consistent.

    For details on how to do it do a search on pillar bedding on this site and also look at Kevin Cram,s
    Bedding jobs to see what they look like if done right.

    If you plan it well and have patience you can even do it your self.

    If you have a smith do it It should not cost over $200.00 + or -.

    If the barrel is floated properly It is aloud to react the same every shot If it has tip pressure after 2
    or 3 shots it will start to move the point of aim in most cases.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  7. JASTECH

    JASTECH Active Member

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    J.E. Ccustom, thanks for reply. Sorry this is late, was bit by a recluse on leg, them little things can sure cause a lot of pain! So, would I be better off with wooden stocks instead of this plastic stuff? I like the feel and looks of wood on them. My Rem 700/270 has wood but my Savage 06 Spring dose not. My Browning .338 A-Bolt Stalker II? is also synthetic, was talked into it 10 years ago and it's still NIB, lol Don't know what to do now as I had a job accident and now disabled so no money like I use to have. Been a major life changing ordeal. Maybe you can set me straight to sell the 338 for money to get my 270 & 06 with barrels, triggers ect. to be LRH rifles to be proud of? You can PM me as I forget where I posted do to my accident.
    >
    Thanks, JASTECH
     
  8. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

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    If you are talking about bedding the synthetic stock that comes with the rifle I would not waste time and money on it. Buy a B&C Medalist with full aluminum bedding block then skim bed that. Then sell the Howa stock for a few bucks. Your first pillar bedding job is not likely to be a stellar performance speaking from experience.

    I just got a Vanguard S2 (Same as the Howa) in 223 that shoots 1/2 MOA out of the box in the synthetic stock it came in. It is a sturdy material that will not compress easily. I plan on shooting it just like it is until I think it needs a new stock and then I'll get the B&C Medalist and skim bed it.
     
  9. Outlaw6.0

    Outlaw6.0 Well-Known Member

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