Free float or not (b s a Rifle)

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by D*N*R*, Oct 20, 2011.

  1. D*N*R*

    D*N*R* Active Member

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    May 25, 2011
    I just inherited a bsa 243 wood stock not much on the net about them. Someone did say dont float them but cant see a disadvantage. I put on new glass and only want to sight it in once. Any one been there?
     
  2. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Feb 3, 2011
    Most guns will shoot better free floated. Some will shoot very well without it.

    I routinely float and bed all of mine.
     

  3. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Jul 29, 2004
    Allways test fire a rifle first. If it shoots leave it alone.

    If it does not shoot to your expectations then bed and float it. you can allways add tip
    pressure afterwards.

    For the most part if a rifle has a light barrel and stock, they normally shoot there best
    with a little tip pressure for the first few shots. But after 2 or 3 shots it starts to move
    around and 5 shot groups are not good.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  4. D*N*R*

    D*N*R* Active Member

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    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    I want to sight it in for 150yards cant do it around my area. I took a swing at it with a glass bed job but stopped before floating per what i read. Normally i would always shoot it first to see any improvement with my bedding. I just read on line these gun dont like floating.
     
  5. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Feb 3, 2011
    Go shoot it and see. JE is right light sporter barrels often will not shoot as well after floating.

    Keep it to three round groups max and let it cool down well between them.