Flatland ranging yotes?

Discussion in 'Coyote Hunting - From 10 Yards to over 1,000 Yards' started by 458win, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. 458win

    458win Well-Known Member

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    Shooting coyotes down here in pivot fields I keep running into the same issues! There is no place to get up high and look down, basically your a touch higher then the coyote. Wherein lies my dilemma. I can't get a range on them! with only 6-8inches of coyote showing above the grass my rangefinder (ziess victory RF binos 10x45) will give me readings varying by 100-150yrds. Pretty tough sending a bullet out of the 308 on a 8inch target when you can be off 50--100yrds. (this is out between 450-900yrds. Not to mention the coyotes rarely old still long enough to range, calc, adjust and shoot.

    Is there a rangefinder that will do better at pinpointing them? Or other tricks of the trade? Thanks in advance.
     

  2. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    Good luck, I hope someone has a super secret trick but pivot fields suck, especially coming of wheat or barley!!
    The best thing I have come up with is to position my self to use the pivot as the target, I also carry Google earth maps of some pivots that I have measured the towers on and I wait till they get to a tower them bop them.
     

  3. 1984nitro

    1984nitro Well-Known Member

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    I too have this problem. I hunt out in southern Idaho were shoots can be long and brush and trees are few and far between. What I came up with is to use a mildot scope. I have a list of ranges and what the coyote will register in my scope. I use 18" as my set height because the average coyote is 18" from foot to top of the back. Then on the same list I have a list of mildot hold over because as you said you don't have time to range, dial, and shoot before they are gone. By using you scope radical for ranging and holdover it keep your eye on the yote and keeps movement down.
    Hope this helps.
     
  4. McTank

    McTank Member

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    458win,

    You might also try developing your engagement area by putting range markers on it. Set markers out at known distances from your shooting position prior to your hunt. There will be no need to range to a coyote once he's in your area, just let him come on line with one of your flags and shoot him. I've known several bowhunters who do this around their stands. I hunt in open, hilly terrain and determine distances to rocks and bushes prior to calling any coyotes, so instead of ranging him I'm dialing in my dope to the nearest marker he's likely to come on line with.

    McTank
     
  5. Catfish

    Catfish Well-Known Member

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    I use the Lica 1,200 and have the same problem at times. I usually have something close I can range though.
     
  6. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    I had the very same problem with both my swaro and Leica CRF. Actually the leica did better when held solidly on sand bags but I was limited to about 700~800 yards. I now have a Vectronix PLRF10. Problem solved. Put it solidly on bags, place the crosshairs on the yote and release the button slowly keeping crosshairs on the yote. Smallest beam you can get and strong enough to range way out there. I have ranged yotes to 1500 plus in wheat stubble with great success. They are not cheap, but they work. To me a reliable RF is just as important as the rifle and scope.

    Jeff gun)gun)
     
  7. sscoyote

    sscoyote Well-Known Member

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    Good luck trying to range them with your reticle beyond 500 yds., especially if their paws can't be seen. I use a back to brisket measurement of 11" in winter. Last year i did successfully rane 2 doigs at right around the 500 yd. mark using a 3 MOA TK Lee dot system. But as range increases so does the inaccuracy of angular measurements. Just several factors that u will have to deal with using this system is steadiness of your reticle on the target, which means prone position most of the time and then u have mirage that will affect accurate interpolation besides height of crops interfering with line of sight. It's better than guessing, but not by much beyond ~500.
     
  8. .30 CAL

    .30 CAL Well-Known Member

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    Step 1: Zero your rifle at 200 yards
    Step 2: Range your field of fire out to 250 yards
    Step 3: Let 'em come to you
    Step 4: Point and click (dang hopefully you load your gun before you start calling I just dropped the hammer on an empty chamber AGAIN).

    Set up a mojo critter or your favorite decoy high enough to be seen over the grass, wheat, whatever is in the field and let the dog do all the work. Now if you wanna shoot them while they're far I would say buy camo netting from cabelas I think they come in 10X20 sheets lay it over your truck and set up on the truck. It will get you off the ground and when you range instead of just pointing and clicking at the whole animal try and put the reticle just above their head or their back if they are broadside, that way your beam is above the grass and just catches the animal. Usually when I'm in that situation I just let them come all the way in and all I have to do is aim and shoot, no turret twisting. I pick landmarks that are at about 250 and once the dog crosses my imaginary line I let 'em have it.
     
  9. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Jeff,

    I sure wish you wouldn't have made this post.:rolleyes: as I've just about talked myself in to the Leica 1600.

    This LRH stuff is starting to get really expensive.:D

    With two rifles good for 1 mile shots, one for quite a bit farther, whatsa fella gonna do?

    With the craftsmanship Kirby has put into these things I figure I owe it to him and the rigs to be at the best level of operation.

    Oh well, it's just money:rolleyes:



     
  10. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Roy, I only wish I would have cleaned the safe and offed the unused rifles and a few things years ago to fund my PLRF10. We drop big bucks on scopes and custom rifles and then we want a rangerfinder for under a grand. In my opinion the RF is just as important as the rifle and scope , especially out past 1000 where the bullet is dropping fast every yard. Accurate distance is a very important part of the ballistic equation. Unless a shooter is ok with walking them in. But that will not work for me. I like the first round cold bore hits.

    I am sure you have some stuff you havent used in a year or more to sell to soften the blow. Thats what I did.:)

    Jeff



     
  11. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    Your killing me!!!!! Ranging a coyote in stubble over 1500yrds is crazy!!!!
     
  12. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    I'm with ya on that!

    I have funds set aside for tracks for my Habitat Invasion Vehicle-Carrier (HIV-Carrier) or if you with 1994 Suzuki 4-door Sidekick. Pretty much an ATV with heater/AC and 80 mph hiway speed. This is to get me into the back country during deep snow.

    Geez, $4k here and $4k there starts to add up.:D

    bigngreen's gears are turning too. I can hear them grinding way down here.:D