Fixed power scope for LR hunting?

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by sportmuaythai, Nov 24, 2012.

  1. sportmuaythai

    sportmuaythai Well-Known Member

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    Does any one hunt LR with fixed power scope? I'm thinking of getting a fixed power scope about 16X, and would like to shoot 400yds up to 700 yds. I figure that lesser feature such as fixed power will mean less problem, and m dot ranging would be easier. If target is further than 400 yds, field of view wouldn't be of a problem. What are your views?
     
  2. Gene

    Gene Well-Known Member

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    Most of today's variables are relatively trouble free. Fixed powers may be OK for ground dwelling varmints, but not hoofed and clawed critters. With a 16x, or other non variable, and you come across a trophy at say 100 yds., you are going to have trouble finding him in the scope, cause the FOV is much less. You can have it both ways with a good variable.
     

  3. sportmuaythai

    sportmuaythai Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for a very prompt reply. I've done a fair share of stalk and shoot with 4x scope, and lost interest in hunting. This LR stuff has rekindle my interest, and I need all help (information) I can get. I think I'll drop my requirement to 10x, with range from 400yds-700yds.
     
  4. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    I tried the fixed power LR thing and didn't like it.

    First problem, discovered while actually hunting, was that the 40 mm objective I chose was way too small. When the other side of the mountain was in the shade it was useless.

    Had to use the second rifle with a 4.5-14X44mm scope. This scope was way better optics and served me well in all lighting and distance conditions. Reticle is mil dot and FFP which I really like.

    But not for ranging!!! Spent plenty of time ranging elk with it. The greater the distance the greater the error. Usually the elk were half as far as I was able to range. This was practice and no shots fired. I then acquired a decent laser range finder and learned the error of my ways.:)

    Also, as mentioned earlier, you'll be in big trouble when a shooter pops up at 75 yards and you can't get on it quickly.

    Fixed power is great for shooting paper and rocks but is less than effective for live animals.

    just my 2 cents:)
     
  5. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    I doubt you'll reach any precision shooting with a bunch of shortcuts and hollywood in scopes.
    You should look at a baseline scope for LRH and consider gains & losses from there.
    Something like a Leupold Mk4 in 8.5x25(with Alumina flip-ups) to begin.

    Go laser ranging. You need speed and accuracy in your field methods.

    If you haven't invested more money in optics than your gun, you're not a long range hunter -yet.
     
  6. Michael Eichele

    Michael Eichele Well-Known Member

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    Been using them for years. I love my mark 4 16x. Bout ready to sell my night force over it.

    The thing about fixed is that they are much brighter and clearer than variable power scopes even of the same magnification. Less lenses means less distortion. They're also lighter.

    With some practice you can shoulder a rifle with a fixed power and be staring right at your target.

    My mark 4 10x is awesome and certainly is more user friendly on those rare 20-100 yard shots just isn't quite comfortable at 600+ yards. The 16x is perfect.

    Only 1 way for you to know. Try it.

    M
     
  7. Michael Eichele

    Michael Eichele Well-Known Member

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    never thought about it that way but so very true!
     
  8. MachV

    MachV Well-Known Member

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    I use a bunch of 12x Leupolds, 2 16x IORs and a Sightron 20x.
    Most of the 12x are used for shooting prairie dogs inside of 350 yards. They have enough field of view and the sight picture is the same in all of them. This makes it a lot easier when switching between 4 different guns.
    The 2 16x IORs have been bounced around for years and have not found a home yet. They are clear scopes that track well, have 100 moa of travel and have a very big field of view but for some reason just have not fit the bill on any one gun.
    The 20x Sightron has 150 MOA of travel and very repeatable clicks but have noticed it lacks light gathering at dusk and dawn.
    I like fixed power scopes for thier larger field if view(compaired to a variable), the consistant sight picture, cheaper price, clearer glass for the $$ and they will usually have more travel.
    Most of my scopes stay at one(usually max) power so a fixed is not a problem for a dedicated rifle anyway

    sportmuaythai
    If your not going to carry this rifle a fixed may very well help you consistantly get to 700 yards and I'll bet it works closer than you think with use. 10x will get you to 700 yards with a good quality scope but 12-16 would be better if your shooting at small targets.
     
  9. sportmuaythai

    sportmuaythai Well-Known Member

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    Thanks MachV, Michael Eichele and royinidaho for kind detailed comments. To be truthful, I've 3x12 56 Swarovski on two of my rifles. One big flaw I find with variable is that frequently I use the highest mag to study things, and leave it there, only to find real target popping up closer and moving. I'll be using laser range finder. I'm glad to hear that Sightron tracks very well. It's one of my considerations, particularly for its huge elevation adjustment range, which may allow for 0 moa scope base. I always hunt guided. This would be a learning scope for LR. If it doesn't work well, I'd change it before I actually hunt LR. What do you guys think?
    The way I've hunted was to get to a high point, and glass. Once a good trophy is located, the guide and I put up a stalk. The way I figure, for LR, once the quarry is spotted, at most it would be is to get into a better shooting spot. BTW the furthest stalk I had was a brown about 4 miles, in Alaska Peninsular. My guide had exceptional sight.
    Oh! I checked my original post, and realize my error. I don't mean using mil dot for ranging, but for reference aiming point, if I don't want to dial up, once the distance is lasered
     
  10. Browninglover1

    Browninglover1 Well-Known Member

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    If you're considering the sightron you should jump on the 16x SIII that SWFA has for 399 right now.
     
  11. MachV

    MachV Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the tip=Those are some good prices on great scopes
    I was looking through their other Sightron deals and found the S1 3-9 Mill-dot so I bought three more of them= More Leupolds will be hitting the road.
    The S1 3-9 is one great scope for $99!!
     
  12. lewwetzel

    lewwetzel Well-Known Member

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    I picked up the 20x SIII for use mostly on varmints, where to me the variables don't seem necessary. Tried the similar Super Sniper 20x a few years back and liked everything but the not-so-good glass; however, am slightly disappointed in the Sightron's, as clarity and detail doesn't seem to be as good as my SII 4-16X Big Sky at longer ranges (the 16X SIII might be a little sharper.) The rear-parallax ring is on the stiff side, too (the first ones in this model were too loose.) Tracking is spot-on. For the discounted price, this is a lot of scope.
     
  13. Browninglover1

    Browninglover1 Well-Known Member

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    I've heard mixed reviews on the glass of the fixed power SIII's. I really want to get a 16x but I'd have to get rid of another scope and I don't know if I should or not.