First reloader, what is a good choice?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by baranx4, Nov 30, 2012.

  1. baranx4

    baranx4 Well-Known Member

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    I see that there are quite a few reloaders out there, what brand and kit is a good choice. From what I saw I was thinking a single stage press would be easiest when starting out. Any words of wisdom?
     
  2. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    If our budget will support a Redding T-7 press you will love it. Get the dies set up once and leave them set. Easy press to use. I have two now and love them.

    Jeff

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  3. g0rd0

    g0rd0 Well-Known Member

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    for starting, deffinatly a single stage press. Once you master that for handgun go dillon, a dillon 550 will out last you. But for rifle stay with a single stage Hornady, rcbs, layman and lee all have good packages for a starter, your budget will guide you.
     
  4. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    spend the extra money and only cry once. Look for a Forster press and their dies. There is no better on this planet.
    gary
     
  5. Canvsbk

    Canvsbk Well-Known Member

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    Spend some time reading a loading manual, that's what you should buy first. They're all pretty good as are the presses that have been mentioned. These guys seem to want to move you along pretty quickly...go one step at a time. You really can't go wrong on a press, it's not like they wear out or something. I'm 59 and I bought a used Lyman when I was 15. Still have it and even use it now and then. My bench has RCBS stuff, Lyman stuff, Lee stuff and a pile of Hornady too. Get a couple manuals and read up first.
    Good luck.
     
  6. drwindmill

    drwindmill Well-Known Member

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    I use both a Redding T-7 and a cheap old Lee Classic Turret. I use the Lee for decapping, and loading 300 WSM. I use the T-7 for all the giant magnum calibers. I can load with very little to no runout on the Lee with quality dies. I don't see any reason not to start with turret type press, I did. Here's a couple pics of my setup.


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  7. baranx4

    baranx4 Well-Known Member

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    Wil all of these kits in a single press work with mags. My longest bullet is probably a 300 win mag or a 338 win mag. Right now I am looking at hornady and rcbs.
     
  8. drwindmill

    drwindmill Well-Known Member

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    Yes, any will work.
     
  9. czsharpshooter

    czsharpshooter New Member

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    Both Hornady and RCBS make good products. I would definitely go with a press made of cast iron not aluminum (I believe that Lee is the only one that makes an aluminum press). Other that the Forester CO-AX press there isn't really any advantage with any of the Iron O-frame presses.
    As far as dies are concerned I would highly recommend Redding or Forester dies.
    Also the Redding powder trickler is far superior to any other trickler I have used.
    Good luck!
     
  10. Greywolf18

    Greywolf18 Well-Known Member

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    I think this is like asking which do you prefer, Ford or Chevy. I'm still relatively new to reloading compared to most on this forum and have only been doing it for a couple of years on and off (damn deployments keep ruining my hunting and shooting time lol). What I personally did was buy the RCBS package to start with. I originally just bought some RCBS dies, but I also have some Forester dies with the micrometer seating. I like the micrometer seating dies the more I use them, but it's not needed. This setup has worked well for me just starting out and I can't comment on other brands because I've honestly never used them. I like the setup so much I haven't even looked at other setups with the exception of dies and maybe an electronic powder thrower, but again that's just me. Good luck with your choices and let us know what you decide, I don't think you can really go wrong with all the choices that have been listed so far.
     
  11. Wachsmann

    Wachsmann Well-Known Member

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    If your looking to buy new stuff cabelas is running a sale or was running a sale on there RCBS complete package. Good time to buy...Christmas sales...For as the press I woud stick with RCBS, Hornedy, Redding, Dillion, or Foster mainly because of strength and long term use. I use a RCBS in a single stage and reload for 4 different calibers. I like the redding dies a tad bet better than the rcbs dies. I think they may pay a little more attention to percission. I have had 2 sets of RCBS that for some reason the decapping stem would not center no manner how hard I tried to re-align. I took them back and was refunded. I think it was the tension screw was not machined correctly. But not to totally knock RCBS because I have RCBS dies that I use constantlly with no issues. I have not tried the hornady dies but I have heard they work great as well. My only susgestion is to stay away from the alunimum Lee press. My bottom pin in the ram warped after the first year of use. I also was using a balance beam scale to measure every power charge and my loads were just not consistant because you are eyeballing the center line every time. "Human error". If all you can afford is a electronic scale and have to dip power I would prefer the electronic over the balance beam. I use the RCBS charge master/despencer and it weigh's out to 1/10 of a grain. My loads shoot 1/2 inch or better now. I think hornaday electronic powder despincer with the scale is about 50 to 60 dollars less than the RCBS and from reviews and speaking with individuals that have them they work just as good. Ive been reloading now for about 8 to 9 years. My next statement might cause some grief but if you are just hunting than I would not get caught up in all the neck turning and the ton of extra brass work that bech rest shootters do. I full length size and trim the brass about every fourth use provided it has not grown to much. It seem to work for me and keeps my volicities about the same or (ES of 15ft/sec). I like to load more during the winter months becuse in utah it is dry inside my house. We run a swamp cooerl in the summer so I load about 100 to 300 rounds in the winter and shoot them the rest of the year. Also these are developed rounds for my rifles and I am not changing anything. Maybe this more info than you wanted but personal opinion is to stay away of the alunimum press. It had cause me some grief for about a month until I figured it out. I had trashed a box or two of 257 weatherby brass by the time I finally figured out it was my press causing the issue. Which the 2 boxes of brass is about the same price of the press.
     
  12. John Galt

    John Galt Member

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    I bought the Lee book and a Lee press kit. I added some dies and a cheap MTM scale.

    No problems in 2 years and all my rifles shoot 1/2 MOA with custom loads.

    I only neck size fire formed loads.

    Save some cash and try it out.

    If you have doubts just buy the Lee book and you will learn just how strong the press needs to be. Most high dollar presses are over engineered.
     
  13. kstrick

    kstrick Well-Known Member

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    The best money you will ever spend will be for an RCBS Charge Master. Dead on accurate.
    I have 2 RCBS and a Hornady single stage press. Dillon 650.
    RCBS dies.