First long range gun

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Yelumhunter, Feb 6, 2013.

  1. Yelumhunter

    Yelumhunter New Member

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    Jan 25, 2013
    I'm getting my first long range specific gun in the next few weeks. It's still being built. It's a 7mm rem 700 action Brux barrel manners stock and a few other bells and whistles.
    But my question is when I get the gun there is a guy here local that said he'd break it in work up a load and figure out all the drop chart stuff for me and have it ready to shoot but he charges around 1000$ bucks to do all that. It also comes with 100 loaded rounds.
    I have bought a reloader and all the stuff needed to reload 7mm should I try and figure it out by my self and put the money saved towards a G7 BR2 range finder.
    Maybe someone on here would want to help with the load work? I'm new so if any of this is not a good way to go let me know or maybe tell me the way I should go about it
    Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. JP100

    JP100 Well-Known Member

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    Im no expert but id try and work up the loads your self. I have been loading for about 6 years and was lucky enough to be taught at school. Ive learnt sooo much over the last five years and have improved my shooting so much.
    Try and find some one in your area willing to teach you? or go and see the guy who is making the loads up for you and see what he does and give a hand maybe?($1000 seems pretty costly). It is time consuming to start from scratch but
    you learn so much.
    Plus if you work up your own loads you can change them depending on range/game ect...
    Theres tonns of videos and books out there that have all the info youl need.
     

  3. trueblue

    trueblue Well-Known Member

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    Don't waste your money, do it your self. That's half the fun.
    It's not hard, and there is plenty of load data out there for 7 RM.
     
  4. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    This is really dependent on the individual but my viewpoint is that it is the load that defines the long range hunting rifle. It appears you have gone through the thought and expense to have a custom built so you appear quite motivated. Learning and understanding the load devopment process will give you full mastery of the sport. While it may seem complex and intimidating, it's not that difficult if you are willing to learn. As previously mentioned, there is a lot of information available and many people, particularly on this site, that are more than willing to share information. IMHO.
     
  5. Joe King

    Joe King Well-Known Member

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    Another for DIY,
     
  6. cohunter14

    cohunter14 Well-Known Member

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    Same here. If you are going to want to reload for it down the road anyway, you might as well learn now. You can do a search on 7mm loads on this website and many others and you will get a ton of results and starting points.
     
  7. Joe King

    Joe King Well-Known Member

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    If you need help there's no shortage of knowledge here to help you on your way.:)
     
  8. BillR

    BillR Well-Known Member

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    Wow $1000 to work up a load. Just think of all the reloading components, bullets, brass etc. that you can buy for that. And better yet think of the trigger time. Trigger time will go a long ways towards getting to the point where you can hit what you are looking at when it comes to long range. Having a gun and load that can do it means nothing if you don't know the gun.
     
  9. mhiltz

    mhiltz Well-Known Member

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    You will learn so much by doing it yourself and you will be happier in the long run. IMO

    However, I can imagine you would be excited to be shooting it right away, so if you decide to part with a $1000. to get you going, I would make it a point to be around when the guy is working up your loads, and pay attention, as previously stated.

    Good luck
     
  10. clemens

    clemens Well-Known Member

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    Building the loads and making drop charts with you behind the gun will give you your true POI do to you holding and shooting it the way you would hold rifle. having some one else do the shooting and sighting it in could throw all the information built up out the window. There are not to many Peaple out there that can shoot the same zero. reloading is fun and relaxing imo
     
  11. COBrad

    COBrad Well-Known Member

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    Not only is there a wealth of knowledge here on LRH, there are some really good books on bench rest quality reloading, which is what you want for long range accuracy. One author that comes to mind is bench rest hall of famer Tony Boyer.
    Who's building your rifle? A good smith should be able to help you quite a bit.
    You asked for hands on help, but where are you, what state?
    If you're going to spend 1K on load development, and you are-one way or another, spend it on tools and learning how to use them.
    It's kinda like the biblical thing about giving a man a fish or teaching him to fish. You want to learn to fish.
     
  12. Yelumhunter

    Yelumhunter New Member

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    Thanks for all the help and advice. I've been looking threw tons of load data and what not its just a lot to try and take in all at once. I'm in utah county ut is there a place or a some one that has a chronograph or are they worth just buying one. I've had lots of luck with the 160 grain nosler accubond. So I wanted to try that and also try the 168 grain Berger I've seen people really like the H1000 powder so I was gonna try that. Any other advice would help. Thanks again
     
  13. cohunter14

    cohunter14 Well-Known Member

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    I would just buy a chronograph... For just over $100, you can find a bunch of them. $100 sure beats $1,000 for someone to tell you what speed they are moving!
     
  14. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    Chronographs are definitely helpful, but you can base your speed off the reloading manual. Look into the LEE reloading manual. It has some really good instruction and information in the front chapters. It would be a good starting spot. Get yourself a digital caliper from midway or a local store. Seat the bullets to the suggested depth and go from there. Never exceed load maximum as written in the manual. I know that I have gotten away with it, and many other guys have as well, but it is done with extreme care and caution when building up loads. Its best as a new loader to stay within the parameters of the manuals minimums and max loads for the given powder charge and bullet. Hodgdon powder is the most popular and readily used for hunting calibers due to its ability to stay consistent through temp changes. For the 7mmRM, I would suggest the 168 Berger, 160 Nosler Accubond, or the Hornady 162 Amax. All good bullets for the specified caliber and long range hunting. I would also suggest Hodgdon H1000 powder, or Alliant Reloader 22 for these weight bullets.

    To do a barrel break in, just google it. There are a ton of different ways to do it, and just pick one and go for it. For break in you can use loads that you want to use for hunting, or just pick a random lighter load so you are not using up your powder.