First Aid Kit/Emergency Kit contents?

Discussion in 'Backpack Hunting' started by esshup, Jul 20, 2008.

  1. esshup

    esshup Well-Known Member

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    I'm looking to throw together a lightweight kit for the backpack. I figure that if it's light enough I will be more apt to keep it in the backpack. Any suggestions on what to pack? I'm talking more of a daypack vs. a week long backpack hunt, but I'd still like to keep it as light as possible.

    Specifically, hunting in the Wy. mountains for Mule Deer. When we're chasing antelope I would throw in something for rattlesnakes and cactus.
     
  2. Scott S

    Scott S Well-Known Member

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    I would throw in some band-aids, polysporin ointment, ace bandage, a few gauze bandage squares, bug bite stick (it looks like a penlight but but has anti sting medicine in it), immodium, aspirin, tums/rolaids, a small ice pack (the ones you crush to activate), and a small roll of athletic tape.
     

  3. drbobc

    drbobc Well-Known Member

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    I would buy a basic first aid kit and if you want specific coverages such as snake bite or anti-venom coverage, discuss this with your doctor. I remeber years ago I put together a first aid kit for a trip sailing to the Virgin Islands. Man I had everything you could imagine and felt like I could even fix broken bones. Whole thing was a joke. I spent a pile of money on everything and discovered everything could easily be covered on the primitive British Virgin Islands. It really becomes an issue of what to take and is it necessary. If you are going on a guided trip, they should have it all covered. Even if you are a doctor, troubles can develop that you do not plan on. Be reasonable and discuss things with a qualified doctor (or an Army medic who probably is best at knowing what is needed).
     
  4. ol mike

    ol mike Well-Known Member

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    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Go to camping survival dot com -good guy to do business with.

    You can get a coglans first aid kit for $6 -then add a couple of 'aleve' tablets ,mini chap stick ,a small baggy w/ vaseline coated cotton balls -[tiny dot on your finger to wipe down a firearm-makes a good fire starter- etc. .
    Get some water purification tablets [katadin].

    Camping survival dot com is a great place for all your small items -great prices on equinox tarps and many other items.
     
  5. esshup

    esshup Well-Known Member

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    Thanks! I plan on having a filter in the pack - although I will also have a 3l bladder. I know that I may be overplanning for only day trips from camp, but we will be camping over an hour from the closest town.....
     
  6. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

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    Some folks like filters and some purification tablets.

    I've used both and I like tablets.

    Tablets are a lot less bulky and lighter.

    Tablets are much easier to use. It takes a lot of work/pumping, often in awkward positons, to get a quart of water. You can spend time pumping water or hunting.

    Filter pumps are susceptible to mechanical break down, tubes falling off, etc. and IMO more susceptible to contamination.

    Filters get clogged.

    And IMO chemicals are more reliable than filters in purifying water.

    If you prefer a filter, I would recommend looking at a bottle with an in line filter and have a spare filter. A lot easier to use, but still some effort sucking the water out of the drinking tube.

    JMO :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2008
  7. 8404Vet

    8404Vet Well-Known Member

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    From a Fleet Marine Force Medic Veteran......

    The best thing to take for trauma would be heavy bandages. I really like bandages that have the straps for applying pressure to the wound without having to hold your hand on the wound. Just place the bandage and tie it down tight, but not too tight....

    Next to that would be a non toxic super glue. This is up for debate because if you approximate a wound with it that is not cleaned out extremely well, it will eventually come apart and cellulitis will follow.

    Ace bandages and sticks will make out all the splinting capabilities needed.

    The worst thing to do is have a 1000 dollar med bag and know how to use 25 cents of it.

    Stay basic.

    Start the breathing, stop the bleeding, treat for shock
     
  8. 8404Vet

    8404Vet Well-Known Member

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    best thing for a snake bite is rapid medical attention. time spent with a snake bite kit is time wasted. Period, anti venom is whats needed.

    matter of fact, id rather rub chew on it for the vasoconstrictive effects, and haul ass to the nearest med facility.
     
  9. guns_and_labs

    guns_and_labs Well-Known Member

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    The best "kit" would be a Wilderness First Aid course.

    Then, skip the prepackaged stuff, and remember the basics (I love the "Start the breathing, stop the bleeding, treat for shock").

    My daypack kit is focused on wound care and enough ortho to make it back to the car. Antiseptic to clean wounds (including cactus), bandaids, a couple of 4x4s, and a "Bloodstopper", and a roller gauze. A couple of strips of moleskin. A couple of Sting-eze pads. SAM splint. Tape. Motrin, Aleve and aspirin. Gloves and a breathing mask. It all fits in a little black ditty bag.

    My call-out kit (I do wilderness S&R as a volunteer, and have been doing and teaching this stuff for over 20 years) has a LOT more stuff in it, but that's because I'm supposed to be a mobile emergency room. When it's just me -- I stick with simple and leave the call-out kit in the truck.

    Snakebite kits are a painful and dangerous joke. Treat the affected limb like a broken bone, and get to antivenom (which you can not carry in a kit). While we still teach the constriction treatment, I've yet to see it done right in the field... and I think I'm up to 25 or 30 snakebite presentations.

    I like the new waterfilters. They're reliable and effective. The straw thingies aren't overly effective, at least the ones I tested in the lab. The tablets take too long for me -- at least for day hikes. But, if you're carrying a bladder, you only need to worry about unplanned bivouacs, so throw in the tablets just in case and skip the weight of the filter.
     
  10. WWB

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  11. guns_and_labs

    guns_and_labs Well-Known Member

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  12. esshup

    esshup Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info. The quick clot is in the bargain cave @ Cabelas, but I don't know what the date of mfg. is, although it has a 3 year shelf life. I'll get a couple to throw in the kit.