factory ammo with high BC

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by 7mmremingtonmagnum, Feb 2, 2014.

  1. 7mmremingtonmagnum

    7mmremingtonmagnum Member

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    does anyone know of some factory ammo for a 30-06 with a BC of higher than .507? ive been looking and i cant find alot of information on the BC of the bullet. best i can find is nosler and berger with about a .649 in 108-190 gr. and them are just the bullets, not factory ammo
     
  2. Kennibear

    Kennibear Well-Known Member

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    I haven't bought factory 30/06 in decades but you need to reference the bullets used in the ammo with the maker's claimed BC on their websites. Or find a bullet that meets your needs and then look for factory ammo that loads it.

    Now you know why most people who reload, reload.

    KB
     

  3. 7mmremingtonmagnum

    7mmremingtonmagnum Member

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    i really want to get into reloading, like BAD!!!!!! i just dont have the means for it right now as im in college living in dorms and they woudnt be too happy with explosives in the rooms... if i could reload id be using berger bullets and custom tailoring the ammo to find what works best, i even have a range 10 minutes from me........ i would love to get into reloading tho
     
  4. Semper Fi 10463

    Semper Fi 10463 Active Member

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    what are you needing to do? the highest bc might not be what you have to have.
     
  5. 7mmremingtonmagnum

    7mmremingtonmagnum Member

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    im not completely set up the best for ELR but i would like to be able to hit steel to 1000-1200 and hunt to about 750. the gun is completely stock right now, if i do anything it will be a trigger job, finish floating and bedding. the floating is done factory but there is one spot that hangs up with a dollar bill. im thinking that i can be perfectly content with MOA at whatever distance i shoot at. and as of right now my 536 shots were MOA if not a small but better. i would like to think that for now i could find a factory load to do what i want and if that means that i have to knock my range back than thats what i will do.:D
     
  6. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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  7. Kennibear

    Kennibear Well-Known Member

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    I would hope that one of the members of LRH that are nearby could lend you a hand. I have always helped newbies that had no equipment to get started in reloading. Making my equipment available and sometimes donating components. Hope others see this and lend you a hand.

    KB
     
  8. Semper Fi 10463

    Semper Fi 10463 Active Member

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    without a big search dont think theres one higher than a berger. ive shot the 06 for 41 years but never over 400yds. new a guy once that shot at a thousand for fun. think he used 180 grain handloads though. i do know remington makes a bonded premium swift sirroco with a high bc. think winchester loads an accubond as well. on a note my 06s dont pattern the remington premiums as well as the accubonds.
     
  9. westcliffe01

    westcliffe01 Well-Known Member

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    You need a membership at a nearby shooting club with a clubhouse and possibly reloading equipment. I would investigate your local options. If you can get set up that way, you would just have to bring dies and components and if you have a locker, the contraband can stay at the club.
     
  10. 7mmremingtonmagnum

    7mmremingtonmagnum Member

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    ive thought about getting some reloading stuff and learning about it and making my own rounds. i would have a hard time trusting someone esle to do them for me with as picky as i would be about them.... but the way i see it is this, if you are picky about how your loads are built then you will get great results at the range too. what could a guy get started into reloading for, equipment wise?
     
  11. westcliffe01

    westcliffe01 Well-Known Member

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    RCBS Rock chucker press kit for $300
    RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Master Single Stage Press Kit
    Hornady Lock N Load press kit $309 Has an electronic vs beam scale in the RCBS kit.
    Hornady Lock-N-Load Classic Single Stage Press Kit

    Then add some dies. If its a 7mm RM then link here 7mm Remington Mag | Rifle Reloading Dies | Dies - Reloading

    The Hornady kit comes with a hand priming tool for setting the primers. You will need a chamfering tool to remove sharp edges from the cases after trimming (included in Hornady Kit). You will need a case trimming tool. I like the Lyman Universal case trimmer Lyman Universal Case Trimmer Kit 9 Pilots $82. If you go with a micrometer adjustable trimmer like the Redding 2400 Match Precision Case Trimmer then the price goes up substantially ($160)

    I suggest that to make your life simpler you get extra shall holders, so that you always have one for the hand primer and another to use in the press.

    Regarding dies, I like to get a full length sizing die (which I seldom use, but then on brass that has been annealed), a high quality bullet seating die like the forster Forster Bench Rest Seater Die 7mm Remington Mag Especially for long pointy VLD bullets, your seater die is important. Then a body sizing die in case I need to bump the shoulder (absolutely the minimum for acceptable chambering - that will give the best brass life) Redding Body Die 7mm Remington Mag
    Finally, I will use a Lee collet neck sizing die without sizing the rest of the shell at all so long as it will chamber fine. Lee Collet 2-Die Neck Sizer Set 7mm Remington Mag

    Since you are not shooting a 223, there is no such thing as "cheap" ammo for a Magnum. You should be able to reload for well under $1/shell after you have paid for your brass. That is using the best bullet, powder and primer you can get. It will not take very long to make up the investment in equipment through savings in ammo and also in having better ammo than you can otherwise get. The most important part is having a load perfectly tuned to your rifle.

    Be advised that powder measures are not very consistent, especially with temperature stable extruded powder. They tend to dispense a few light charges and then a heavy one. I set mine to dispense light and trickle in the balance on the scale for each cartridge. Since I am not feeding a machine gun, I am Ok with the speed of this process since it is clearly adequately precise and will do until I can afford one of the powder measures that weighs out the charge...

    Good luck.
     
  12. azsugarbear

    azsugarbear Well-Known Member

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    The biggest problem in getting high BC bullets in loaded ammo stems from the fact that most VLD designs are not compliant with SAAMI specs. These high BC bullets wont fit/work, or shoot well in a lot of stock rifles. That was the entire reason why Berger came out with their "american classic" design. Same BC as VLD brother, but with a design that met SAAMI specs so ammo mfgs could use it.
     
  13. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    7MM-what rifle? what scope? reloading is not cheaper. it just gives you control . i made the investment and started reloading before i got into college . i am sure HSM has several different factory loads in 30-06 with berger bullets with a high BC. reloading gives you control to do some adjusting of seationg depth, primer, powder charge to find something your rifle likes. components are difficult to find right now , factory ammo also.
     
  14. azsugarbear

    azsugarbear Well-Known Member

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    I share a slightly different view. I think reloading is less expensive, providing the cost of your equipment is amortized over a life time of reloading. In my younger years, I used to shoot competitive pistol. There was no way I was going to be able to afford shooting 300 rounds per week without getting into reloading. A side benefit was being able to craft precise ammo (meant more in rifle than pistol reloading).

    What I ultimately found with the pistol shooting (and to a lesser extent with my rifles) is that the savings were swallowed up by more shooting. For the same dollars, I was able to make & shoot nearly twice what I would have, had I been purchasing ammo instead.