Ether Goat

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by Buffalobob, Mar 11, 2009.

  1. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    Well, the lazy Ether Bunny got eaten by Mr. Fox, maybe the fox has some kiddies in a den somewhere. Anyway, Fed Ex hired Denny Hamlin’s brother-in-law who is one smelly goat. Just look at what he brought me for fletching—Goat glue!!! I guess it is good that they didn’t hire the gorilla or I would have wound up with Gorilla glue. :D

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  2. Ol'Gator

    Ol'Gator Well-Known Member

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    Looks like a fun time ahead. It does cost a little more to go first class but well worth it. Goat Tuff can't be beat and the bitzenburger is an excellent choice.

    Good to see your interest in bowhunting has been renewed. To say I'm consumed with it may be an understatement.
     

  3. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    There does not seem to be an established recipe for a long range bow. So in some respects I am traveling blind. But the principles are the same as a rifle. Accuracy and speed with a heavy bullet (arrow).

    What I know is that high angle fletching creates a lot of drag. That would be like shooting a round-nosed flat-based bullet at long range (it can be done as the buffalo rifles have proven). Straight fletching creates less drag but is less stable. Short fletching creates less drag but may not be enough to stabilize the arrow for accuracy.

    I expect I will have to experiment quite a bit to get a fletching that suits my purposes.

    In case you are wondering-- this journey may take me two or three years. It is really a fascinating learning experience for me. I expect I will make quite a few mistakes along the way but that is what life is all about.
     
  4. Ol'Gator

    Ol'Gator Well-Known Member

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    Half the fun is geting there.

    I'm by no stretch of the imagination knowledgable about long range archery. I spend almost all my pratice time shooting 60 yards, beyond that is uncharted as far as my experience goes. What I have found is the blazer vanes, although short, will stabilize my broadheads as well as any fletching I've used.

    The higher profile along with being a little more stiff seems to be the answer. I set them at 2 degrees offset which is all that is necessary. I have found the shorter vanes has an additional advantage. Shooting with a crosswind, the blazers are less affected than say four inch vanes.
     
  5. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    I received a Goat tracker number today. The goat has made it all the way from Tuscon, Arizona to Pennsylvania and he should be at my house in just a couple of more days. I bet he has a sore back and tired feet from carrying that big box so far. :D