Does Strapping down your rifle result in tighter shot groups?

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by bbromgard, Feb 28, 2009.

  1. bbromgard

    bbromgard Member

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    I was sighting in my 270 with a new scope today and I am wondering if strapping down the gun to reduce (Kick) will improve my grouping? Currently, I rest the rifle on sandbags with the butt against my shoulder, resulting in 3" groups at 200 Yards with about 10 mph. breeze. The dis-atvantage I have noticed is the rifle will jump more than normal because of my loose grip. Any advice would be helpful. BB
     
  2. Dano1

    Dano1 Well-Known Member

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    I don't think "strapping down" a rifle would help due to the stresses that are induced on the gun itself. Sandbags are the a very good way to site in a rifle. it's way better than some of the nuts that I see at the range. They usually use a rolled up coat or blanket. They are also happy to hit a paper plate at 100 yds 3 times out of 5.

    the best way to stop muzzle rise is to have a firm grip, but consistant grip on the fore end with the bags supporting it. There are other things that can help accuracy other than the jump. The bullet is already gone when the rifle bbl starts to rise. A good trigger job, a bedded action and good optics will help the rifle. Refineing the reload also helps alot. 3" at 100 yds isn't that bad especially for a standard weight bbl on a factory rifle.

    Hope this helps,

    Dan
     

  3. shootinfool

    shootinfool Well-Known Member

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    I guess it all depends on how it is strapped down. If there is anything that is in contact with the barrel it could affect the accuracy of the gun. If you are stable when you shoot then the groups will be as good as the gun gets. If you are not stable then there could be some human error in it. I know of a range that has a setup here in utah for sighting in and some people use it for testing loads when working up a load for the gun. this setup is inside of its own "shack" and it clamps your gun down and uses a remote system to fire the gun at the target at 100 yds. this is supposed to eliminate all of the human error and keep the exact point of aim to give you the best idea of what your gun can do and also how much you need to move your scope to get it where you want it. I have not used it but have seen it used several times and often wonder how reliable it is. Hope this helps.
     
  4. bbromgard

    bbromgard Member

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    Thanks for the input, I'm fairly new to long-range shooting. I tried a new load today along with the new scope. 2nd load Win. brass, Fed.210 primers, 55 GRN's of H-4831, 150 GRN. Nosler Partition with an OAL of 3.295. To be truthfull, I was not that impressed. I shot 30 rounds of my handloads and 20 rounds of midrange factory ammo, I did not see much improvment in the grouping. It looks like I have some (tweeking) to do. As soon as my shoulder heals. Ha,Ha Thanks again, BB
     
  5. shootinfool

    shootinfool Well-Known Member

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    good luck with the load development process, it can be frustrating but in the end when you find the perfect load for the gun, it is well worth all the trouble.
     
  6. RockyMtnMT

    RockyMtnMT Official LRH Sponsor

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    If you are not already doing it, put a sand bag under the butt of the rifle. Hold onto the with your trigger hand with a consistent grip. Leave your non-trigger hand off the rifle and let it recoil. Use your non-trigger hand to squeeze the bag under the butt to get your elevation exact. This should be the most consistent way to shoot your rifle. I would not strap the rifle down unless you intend to strap it down in the same exact way when you are hunting.

    Steve
     
  7. bbromgard

    bbromgard Member

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    Currently, I do not put a bag under the butt. I'll do it next time, it makes good sense. BB
     
  8. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    I have a Caldwell led sled (bought it on sale for $89.99) and rigged it with a $1.99 pair of straps. Lead weight are too pricey at the moment so I just use my snow chains :D.


    [​IMG]

    I shoot well within 2" @ 300 yards with 180G Remington Corelokts.

    (GunBroker.com Message Forums - BRR Range Report)

    Good luck!

    Ed
     
  9. DogZilla

    DogZilla Member

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    yes especially if you strap it to your back and run a string from the trigger while you are out in the country hunting coyotes....:cool: that way

    YOU CAN KEEP THE SAME TIGHT GROUPS YOU GOT WHEN YOU STRAPPED IT DOWN AT THE RANGE !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    gun)lightbulb:rolleyes::D

    I THINK ILL JUST SHOOT MYSELF NOW AND GET IT OVER WITH.......
     
  10. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    Confucius Say...

    "When called an idiot sometimes is better to be quiet, than open mouth and remove all doubt".
     
  11. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    Well it sounds like you are having rifle issues. Not sure of your level of shooting, but sound mechanical to me. Check all of you norms: tight scope rings, tight base, barrel is free floating.

    3 inches at 100yrds, tells me ther is a problem. My worst hand loads still produce 2 inches or less. On average 1.5 inches. Make sure your barrel is clean and that you are doing every thing the same. Factory loads out of a factory rifle should be in my opinion 2 inches or less, usually less.

    You may have developed a flinch due to recoil. Try doing some dry firing to see if you flinch antisipating recoil. I would look into a decelorator pad to reduce the recoil also. If you can afford to do so, take your rifle to a gun smith and have him take a look and see if mechanically the rifle is sound. Trigger jobs generally are not the expensive for a factory trigger adjustment. My smith charges $35 to smooth and lighten the trigger pull.

    Hope this helps and happy shooting.
    Tank
     
  12. outwest1

    outwest1 Active Member

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    dano 1 3" at 100yds is good? your kidding right!
     
  13. dewiseman

    dewiseman Well-Known Member

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    I think he said a 3" group at 200 yards and for an off the shelf gun that might not be to bad. I shoot with a caldwell rest and rear bag. This really helps get you better groups. As stated previously, it is important to support both front and rear of the gun. I was shooting a new rifle and was not satisfied with the grouping I was getting so as I looked my rifle placement over, I found that the rifle was recoiling back and the sling swivel stud was catching on my front rest bag and had ripped it. Since then I pay more attention to how my rifle is positioned and I started pulling the rifle into my shoulder better and my groups shrank down to a tiny hole. Good luck
     
  14. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    I have to apologize, I just read the original post and it just registered that he said 3" at 200 yards. I have never tried grouping at 200 yet, so my information is void. Sorry about the misunderstanding. 3" off the shelf with factory ammo really isn't that bad.

    I still stand by my trigger job comment though. It will help tighten up those groups.

    Tank