Does Leica CRF 1600 compensate for angle?

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by mjm0073, Jul 18, 2011.

  1. mjm0073

    mjm0073 Member

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    I am about to purchase a new rangefinder and am wondering if the Leica CRF 1600 will give me a "line of sight" reading and a "shoot to" reading? From what I've read on-line it appears that it gives the angle but that is it--I have to do the math from there. If that is the case, I am thinking the cheaper CRF 1000 or 1200 with an angle cosine indicator mounted on my rail would be the same cost and give me the cosine to use.

    Any thoughts and/or ideas of how to go about this in the most efficient and effective manner???
     
  2. jeff 300

    jeff 300 Well-Known Member

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  3. Waldemar

    Waldemar New Member

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    In matter fact Leica CRF 1600 compensates for the angle although please note that the compensation is displayed in 0.1mRad (cm/100m) or inches. That feature is as much annoying as much it is useful if you have ballistic elevation turret.
    Quote form page 28 of the manual:
    Notes: The displayed holdover value / correction value (see also p. 31) is always shown in cm for a range of 100 m or in inches for 100yards. The correction value for the range actually measured is automatically converted to 100m/100yds. The major advantage of this is that the correction value can be set directly on the riflescope, i.e. without elaborate prior conversion.
    Also note that: Holdover corrections for ranges above 500m are not shown due to the overall uncertainty factors.
     
  4. LouBoyd

    LouBoyd Well-Known Member

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    I don't know if the CRF 1600 compensates for inclination angle or not, but there is no mention of that capability in the user manual.
    Leica Rangemaster CRF 1600 Manual

    I'm not impressed by Leica's idea of ballistic computation either. From the manual they only offer 12 preset trajectories (none user setable) with zeros of 100 or 200 yards (or meters) and a maximum range for the tables of 300 yards (or meters) . What good is that with a rangefinder capable of 1600 yards? None of the 12 trajectories are even close that of my long range or subsonic rifles. I had considered buying a CRF1600 until I read the manual.

    I'll keep my Laser Technology impulse 200XL It's reliable to a mile with an inclinometer and serial output to link to a ballistics calculator. Just press the laser trigger. It dumps the range and incination data to the PC when does the caluclation. The rangefinder contains no ballistics tables or computations so it will work with any rifle, cartridge, and bullet. It's disadvantage is that it's about four times heavier than the leica. The advantage is it works.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2011
  5. Ernie

    Ernie SPONSOR

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    What is the cost of your LRF?
     
  6. LouBoyd

    LouBoyd Well-Known Member

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    The LTI Impulse 200XL is $2900 new from Optics Planet. I got mine used on Ebay for $1100. It's made for industrial and surveying applications,, not specifically for hunting or shooting. It has a 2000+ yard range with an internal inclinometer and serial computer interface. Readings can be triggerd from buttons on the rangefinder or by computer input. Data is output as ASCII strings and displayed on an LCD screen,
     
  7. Ernie

    Ernie SPONSOR

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    Thanks
     
  8. Waldemar

    Waldemar New Member

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    Yes, Leica’s manual can be improved. To start with they using wrong terminology, CRF 1600 is not displaying “correction of the holdover“ but a correction of the scope. As to the compensation for the angle I had to prove that to myself by measuring target 17deg down the hill at 440m and compare the reading with a level target at 440m. The difference was 2 = .2mRad = 2cm at 100m that in turn translates to 8.8cm at 440m; all for table EU3. So now you and others can know that CRF 1600 compensates for the angle although Leica makes it very confusing. The Impulse 200 XL is entirely different equipment and truly not applicable for hunting; I see many versions at > Laser Technology TruPulse 200 Laser Rangefinders ON SALE Tru Pulse Laser Rangefinder 7005030 Hypsometers w/ Computer Interface Data Port 7005030

    To cover the filed completely you may like to consider > Horus Vision

    I copied our correspondence to Leica and hope they will have something to say for themselves.