Do you need to size brand new cases?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by jmarion88, Sep 10, 2013.

  1. jmarion88

    jmarion88 Member

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    Do I need to size brand new Remington cases straight out of the bag?

    Thanks.
     
  2. MTBULLET

    MTBULLET Well-Known Member

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    yes,
    unless you trust the guy that inspected/bagged/shipped 'em.
     

  3. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    Not if they hold bullets & fit in the chamber.
    You should still prep them though. At least trimming if needed, put a chamfer to mouths before seating, etc.
    1st firing is 1st fire-forming brass to your chamber
     
  4. MagnumManiac

    MagnumManiac Well-Known Member

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    You don't need to FL size them, but I always run new brass through a neck die to ensure the case mouths are round and true. If you don't have a neck die, you can still use a FL die to accomplish the same thing, just leave the die out of the press 2-3 full turns from contact with the shell holder.
    A good chamfer also helps on the inside of the case mouth.

    Good shooting!

    Cheers.
    gun)
     
  5. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    +1

    I Go one step further, After I size them, I trim them to length and turn the outside of the necks
    just enough to clean them up and then weight sort them to look for culls.

    This lets me start with "Good" brass and makes working up loads easier, saving time and components. It also assures good fire forming to my chamber and for 4 or 5 loads I don't have to
    do anything to my brass

    Just the way I do it.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  6. Catfur

    Catfur Well-Known Member

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    I've even gotten cases with dinged up necks from Lapua. I imagine that with visible damage to necks (presumably from bouncing around during shipping/handling) that there is invisible neck deformation at times. Sizing should eliminate this.
     
  7. Birdhunter1

    Birdhunter1 Well-Known Member

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    I always do just to make sure I have no case mouths out of round then I trim them all to length. One time while doing this I noticed one case went into my .243 die too easily. Turns out there was a 7mm-08 case in a bag of .243 brass.
     
  8. jimbires

    jimbires Well-Known Member

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  9. dig

    dig Well-Known Member

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    Remington brass, Winchester brass Yes! Lapua or Norma optional.
     
  10. SavageLapua

    SavageLapua Member

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    I resize all new brass. My goal is reducing possible neck run out and dented case necks.

    SL
     
  11. tomestone

    tomestone Well-Known Member

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    Win.and Rem.new brass I run threw the case tumbler ,relube, F.L. resize , then reload ,I find that the lube on some new brass:) has a lot of grit in it.
     
  12. BigJohnH

    BigJohnH Member

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    Short answer, YES.
     
  13. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    No matter the brass brand, it's every bit as foreign to YOUR gun, until you've fire-formed it.
    So initial sizing for new brass, that's not being formed into something else, is only needed -when actually needed(doesn't fit/won't hold a bullet).

    All else is taken care of with initial preps, including expanding out any dings in necks.
     
  14. FAL Shot

    FAL Shot Well-Known Member

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    My CZ rifles have match grade chambers and a FL sizing die barely sizes them down at all after firing. If the case is tight in the die when new, then it needs to be resized. If not, and it fits in the chamber, then load up the case and fireform it, provided it isn't over max trim length.

    One thing you might need to do to new cases is to anneal them, if it hasn't already been done.

    If new cases are oversize and need to be resized, then polishing them will allow them to be resized much easier, with reduced case lube and no chance of oil dents.