Do Better Triggers really make a Difference

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by prdvet, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. prdvet

    prdvet New Member

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    Hey everyone, I wasn't sure where to post this, but I have a question about shooting.
    I have an DPMS 308 that I finished building a while back and had my friend take it to the range today to test it out. The guy is a shooter that's why I had him test it. Anyway I haven't upgraded the trigger yet and he was telling me that the best he could do was about 1.2 inch groups. Most groups he said were in the 2 inch range. He didn't know it had a stock trigger until he started shooting, then realized he had to really concentrate to tighten up the groups. He only fired 20 rounds then jumped on his Rem. 700 PSS.
    My question is will a better trigger really help the groups from 2inch to sub moa in the .75 range, given the driver do his part of course.
    All my other AR's are carbines so I never thought about upgrading the trigger with those.
    I was curious as to stock AR triggers really being that horrible for long range work
     
  2. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    A good trigger will always help the accuracy if the rifle and shooter are capable of good
    accuracy.

    What I consider a "Good" trigger is one that will break clean every time with no creep or over travel and cannot be anticipated by the shooter.

    Some factory triggers can be tuned to perform very well , But the quality of the better after market triggers materials and precision is better (That's why they cost more).

    More than any thing it will make the shooter do better.

    J E CUSTOM
     

  3. gamedog

    gamedog Well-Known Member

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    Stock AR triggers and tight groups usually don't happen to go together.
    You could send it off to Bill Springfield triggers for under $45 and have a much better trigger or buy one of the various after market triggers. I have a JP in my DPMS 308B..very nice!
     
  4. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    A new trigger won't make your weapon any more accurate, it might make you more accurate however. Maybe your buddy just isn't used to a two stage trigger found on every AR/ M16 variant I've ever shot. The question is- is the trigger too heavy for YOU to engage without moving the whole dang rifle? It may not be the trigger at all. It could be the weapon, the ammo, a combo of the two or the shooter himself. YOU need to shoot it and see what YOU think about it.
     
  5. KYPD

    KYPD New Member

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    First post. Howdy.

    A good trigger makes a big difference for most people seeking ultimate accuracy. It always has for me. For the AR15, I own Giselle and Jewell triggers, and I have shot Timney and KAC. I like the Gissell best for a hunting rifle. The Jewell is very complicated, and a bit delicate.
     
  6. prdvet

    prdvet New Member

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    I know the trigger is not going to make the gun more accurate, I am no fool. On my remington PSS I haven't upgraded the trigger and do really well. None of my rifles have trigger jobs and I can shoot pretty well with them and my buddy shoots twice as good as me. If he can't get it to group all that well with the stock trigger. my question is does aftermarket setup really that much of a difference in your squeeze.
    Like I said I have only AR carbines and never thought about shooting for groups with these. This is the first AR in 308 that I wanted to shoot at some distance with.
    Guess I'll have to get an RRA 2 stage and see what it can do. I currently can't test my rifles. I recently had surgery and can't do anything physical for a while, that's why my buddy shot it.
     
  7. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

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    A poor; too stiiff, gritty, inconsistent trigger will make accurate shooting much more difficult. Iif it's really bad, or your shooter just can't cope well with it, it could make all the difference.

    I've gotten used to good triggers and find poor ones very difficult to manage. Regardless of wether or not things tighten up, a nice trigger will enormously enhance your shooting.

    To me, a $3k rifle aint worth shooting if it's got a sorry trigger on it. $45- to a couple hundred is cheap, high return investment.
     
  8. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    Gotcha there PRDVET, don't want to push the healing proccess. Several years back I had some of the vertebrates in my neck fused together and was out shooting a month later with a brace on my neck...I never claim to be the smartest guy in the world. But the reason your buddy shoots better then you may be because he shoots more then you. If it's the recoil you are worried about then do a lot of dry firing. Generally speaking, I think that most of the triggers on our issued weapons are horrible for precision work. I have picked up a few M16A4's that were designated marksmen rifles and had the soldiers tag it for maintenance because it had a 12+ pound trigger pull, and these guys were effective with them. Most of the issued M4/M16 rifles that I have checked had pulls in the 7lbd range. I think this is for a reason, these things are put through hell and it only needs to go off when excited Joe wants it to.
    If you think a replacement trigger will help then go for it. I don't think it'll make things worse.

    Good luck, with the rifle and recovery.