Dies Oversizing brass

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by adiredneck, Nov 30, 2013.

  1. adiredneck

    adiredneck Active Member

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    I bought a set of Lyman 30-06 dies last spring because I couldn't get RCBS or Hornady dies. I fought with the sizing die for several months. I had backed out primers on once-fired brass in Winchester, Federal and Remington brass. I tried all types of powders in two rifles with the same results. I tried adjusting the die in and out. I reload for 5 other cartridges and have never had trouble adjusting the sizing dies right out of the box.

    I finally had enough and bought a set of Hornady dies and shot a couple of new factory rounds to get some brass to try and my problem is finally gone. No backed out primers.

    So I have around 75 casings now that I had sized with the Lyman die. If I continue to shoot them, will they eventually expand to normal size, or should I toss them? I have shot some of the bad brass and re-sized with the Hornady dies, but anything that previously was sized with the Lyman die will back the primer out, indicating that it has sized the brass too small. The primers are barely out of the casing, about .001"

    Keep the old brass, or toss it?
     
  2. g0rd0

    g0rd0 Well-Known Member

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    get yourself a hand held primer pocket uniformer. Lyman makes 1 for under $20.00, If this works keep the brass, if not you have not wasted your money I use one and it is nice to have all of the primers at the same depth. You only use it once after the first rezising of a fired factory load (and also before loading never fired brass).
    I also use the flash hole debur tool, just the once.
     

  3. TJAY

    TJAY Well-Known Member

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    Shoot it and it will expand to your chamber. Then use your Hornady dies. So keep it.
     
  4. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    Primers can't 'back out' unless the shoulders are set back too far. It isn't dies, as such, that set shoulders back too far, it's the users; those things do screw back up a tad.

    Primers that set back and don't get reseated when fired are far below normal chamber pressure. If you load them to normal pressure your set back primers would be as flattened as a pancake, making most reloaders yell "excessive pressure" when the only problem is a sloppy chamber fit because of jamming the poor cases as far into the sizer die as they can go,

    Reload your slightly overly resized cases and shoot them. Your real question is, what are you going to do with an extra set of .30-06 dies?
     
  5. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    +1 Boomtube
     
  6. adiredneck

    adiredneck Active Member

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    I'll hang onto the set of Lyman dies. I figured I would keep using the seating die for some bullets so I don't need to adjust the Hornady seating die in and out.

    I forgot to mention, I also had problems with stuck cases with the Lyman sizing die. This is the only die that ever gave me that trouble. I had to use 2x the lube in order to avoid that problem.