Danner Pronghorns - How much insulation ?

Discussion in 'Elk Hunting' started by orion2000, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. orion2000

    orion2000 Well-Known Member

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    To the guys wearing Danner Pronghorns, how much insulation ? I am contemplating purchasing a pair of Danner Pronghorns for elk hunting. Just found out that they come in 3 or 4 insulation levels, 400gr, 800gr, 1200gram. Which to choose ?

    My primary objective is Colorado Second Rifle season. I average 5 to 6 miles per day, 500 to 1,000 verticle feet, 30 to 35 lb Eberlestock pack (including rifle). The past two years have started out 50* to 60*F and dry the week before, and, ended up 20* to 25* F with 8" to 18" of snow on the ground when we pull out. On hunt days, I typically "hike" in to get somewhere, sit for 2 to 3 hours, still hunt for a couple hours, sit for an hour or 2 until dark, and then "hike" back out.

    MY initial inclination was to go with the 800gr or 1200gram, (I hate cold feet). But, I do not want to waste money on a pair of boots where too much insulation decreases the "hike-ability" of the boot.

    Your thoughts ?
    .
     
  2. NW Hunter

    NW Hunter Well-Known Member

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    I am on my third pair of Pronghorns now.
    My first pair were 400's. Because I sweat so much, my feet would be wringing wet and then they would get cold.
    My last 2 pair are uninsulated. I just put on a good pair of wool socks and I'm good to go.
    I deliver coffee for a living and today I was jumping out of the truck into snow slush puddles at least 6-8 in deep and never got cold feet.

    During my hunts, I like that my feet don't get too hot during my hikes. It takes away from my focus on the stalk.

    Randy
     

  3. jmden

    jmden Well-Known Member

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    You also might consider taking a good look at the Danner Raptor as a great all around big game hunting boot. It's US made instead of made in China and will last longer with better materials and construction and can be rebuilt for a nominal fee. My brother recently found a pair for 40% off at $180 at a local Wholesale Sports. Good luck!
     
  4. wasgas

    wasgas Well-Known Member

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    I have the 400gr and try to only wear them at or below freezing, the rest of the time I wear uninsalated boots
     
  5. str8shoot

    str8shoot Well-Known Member

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    Spend another hundred and get one of the US made Danners, they are much better. They will outlive several pairs of of the imported ones and are way cheaper in the long run. I've got a new pair of Canadiens now and had a pair of Trophys before that. They were ready to hunt right out of the box. They are both 600gr thinsulate. I've worn mine in the mid 70's down below zero and nothing breathes like leather, which keeps you dry. I never even think about my feet until I get home from a hunt and take them off. The imported ones won't breathe like a leather boot. Try a pair of the U.S. made ones on and compare. My Danner Canadiens are the most comfortable shoes of any kind I own, and probably will be for the next 10-15 years.
     
  6. Capt Academy

    Capt Academy Well-Known Member

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    I have had 3 pair of the pronghorns with the last pair having 400 grams of ins. I agree with the other post, skip the ins and go with a good pair of wool socks. Like you, I hike a bunch and do not like the extra bulk, but that's me, I like to hunt in lite boots.
     
  7. Magnumitis

    Magnumitis Well-Known Member

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    I have a 400 gram pair and they will work great for the weather you're talking about.
     
  8. Aviator

    Aviator Active Member

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    I hunted 3rd rifle last year in mine deep snow and cold temps..all I wore was the 200gram all leather pronghorns with smartwool heavy hunting socks and gaiters..If your going to be sitting for very long I would probably look into the 400 or 800 gram version..
     
  9. MHO

    MHO Well-Known Member

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    You will be happy with the 400 gram.
     
  10. silvercreekguide

    silvercreekguide Well-Known Member

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    I am a guide in southwest Colorado and my pronghorns did not even last a year. Spend the money and get the American made Danners or even better i would take a look at Schnee's or Kenetrek. Great boots and amazing service
     
  11. silvercreekguide

    silvercreekguide Well-Known Member

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    Oh and for the insulation 200 if walking and 400-800 if you are going to be sitting or riding a horse for periods of time
     
  12. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

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    in my experience 2-400 is plenty for any amount of hiking and if you think your going to get cold add wool socks and always pack the "Hot Hands" packets you can throw them in your boot and be toasty warm. if you have too much insulation your feet will sweat then when it gets cold you have wet feet which is a recipe for disaster
     
  13. elkaholic

    elkaholic Well-Known Member

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    Mine are uninslated for light weight. I hunt in N. Id. and unless I sit for long periods, I have no problem staying warm. I wear merino wool socks inside......Rich
     
  14. Red hunter

    Red hunter Well-Known Member

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    This year I tried something new, to me anyway. I wore uninsulated boots and packed a set of artic shield boot covers. After sitting for about 2 hours my feet were to the point of painful cold [ 10 degrees] I reached into pack and put them on and within 20 min my feet were toasty warm. They were a gift from a friend, one of the best I have gotten. Cold feet in a tree stand can ruin a hunt. I told another friend about the experience and he said he has some but never used them. The next mornings temps were about the same and at lunch he told me he had waited till his feet were so cold they hurt and put the covers on with the same results. They are one of the first things I pack now. I have been told that you can also throw some hand warmers in them if you want to cook your feet.