Coyote eye sight

Discussion in 'Coyote Hunting - From 10 Yards to over 1,000 Yards' started by Losthwy, Jan 11, 2013.

  1. Losthwy

    Losthwy Well-Known Member

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    Let me start by stating I don't hunt coyotes. But have been involved in retriever hunt tests and field trials for 9 years. What has that got to do with coyote hunting? In training retrievers doing marks at 400 distances you learn a thing or two about K-9 eyesight whether it be a Labrador or a coyote. They are both dogs and share much of the same genes including what they see or not see. One of the most misunderstood tenants of dog eyesight is their ability to see color. No dogs are not color blind- that is they see all colors in black and white, and in shades of grey. Far from it. They are able to see in the blue-violet and yellow spectrum. In thinking about what to wear when coyote hunting anything blue might not be the best choice. What they can't see are green and red-orange. Dogs see green and red-orange as YELLOW. If you ever watched retriever trainers running blinds they put out an orange bumpers and orange blind stakes to mark the blinds. Dogs also have less visual acuity than people. That is they see in less detail than humans. Well how can a retriever see a small bumper thrown 400 yards away if that is the case? Dogs have a good ability to see movement. The pattern of camo is less important than the value. Value refers to how light or dark it is. Retriever trainers do "retired marks" where the gunners hide behind camo blinds and umbrellas. Camo blinds and umbrellas for the most part are dark valued and the dogs can easily spot them. Which is why dog trainers use natural features when they can to hide themselves. And why I painted my umbrellas with lighter colors. Field trialers spend a lot of time looking out hundreds of yards at blinds and seeing how well they blend in. "Brushing up" a blind helps. Putting blinds in front of natural features, cutting vegetation and tying it on the material or just lying it on the material. A consideration for western hunters is finding camo that is not too dark. Most camo on the market is too dark for typical western hunting (Mossy Oak). Though recently the choices have improved. I have included a link that gives some good infomation. I have included a link that has some examples and other information. Good hunting.
    Dr. P's Dog Training: Vision in Dogs & People
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2013
  2. ntg

    ntg Well-Known Member

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    Good read. There's a similar read on predatormasters.com that details this, and provides some good photo comparisons (using filters, etc. to simulate what coyotes see) with different clothing on (different camo patterns, blue jeans, etc.). Might look there if your interested in more.
     

  3. Cold Trigger Finger

    Cold Trigger Finger Well-Known Member

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    Good to know. I've long thot the dark blob of a lot of camo is worse than say the old ameoba blob tan brown.
    I've also noticed that it is a lot easier to see a dark brown or black bear than it is to see a blond- silver grizzly. Moose are a lot easier to spot than a caribou. And black wolves are the easiest to spot, at least until sundown.
     
  4. rick523

    rick523 Well-Known Member

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    Think about how hard it is to see a deer until they move and there not wearing any camo :D
     
  5. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    From my experience the eyesight of a coyote is incredible. Combine this with acute hearing, smell, and general lack of curiosity, for me , they are one of the most challenging targets. In the Northeast we many times loose the advantage of distance/open space compared to my experiences out west, and their defenses become magnified. From a camo standpoint, the Giily suite with matching shades has proven to be by far the most effective camo. From a downwind position, I have had them within 10 yards. However, move one inch and they are gone! The key is to have a distraction that focuses their attention elsewhere, like a Mojo that's spiked with rabbit scent.
     
  6. Topgun 30-06

    Topgun 30-06 Well-Known Member

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    "However, move one inch and they are gone! The key is to have a distraction that focuses their attention elsewhere, like a Mojo that's spiked with rabbit scent. "


    Yep!!!
     
  7. bigblazer433

    bigblazer433 Member

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    Very interesting thanks for the read
     
  8. Cold Trigger Finger

    Cold Trigger Finger Well-Known Member

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    But sometimes they can look at you and not spook. I have the advantage a lot of times to hunt where the totes aren't trained by other hunters.