Cooper Rifle Help!!! Single Shot??

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Rock Jock, Mar 1, 2013.

  1. Rock Jock

    Rock Jock Well-Known Member

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    I have a chance to pick up a couple of Cooper rifles. The only thing though is both are single shots.

    I know that Cooper line offers a lot of single shot models. My thoughts are, why?

    Can I get some feedback about on the Cooper single shots of why someone would purchase a single shot rifle over a repeater? And if you did, did you regret buying a single shot later on?

    Do the single shot rifles sell for less than a repeater?

    Thanks!!
     
  2. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    The only Cooper single shot rifles I've really been around much are 22 rimfires, and they are extremely good rifles. They won't run with the big dogs very well (like a Calfee XP100 conversion), but at least shoot as well if not better the the Remington mod. 40 series. I have seen a couple Cooper single shot varmit rigs, and they shot extremely well!

    The single shot action will usually be stiffer and thus flex less under high pressures. (about all I shoot anymore). I don't own a Cooper. My single shots are all Savage and Remington conversions, and have zero desire for a varmit rig in a repeater action anymore. You'll learn to shoot slower, and thus keep heat out of the barrel a little better. Plus your not tied down to an overall length restricted by the length of the mag well. If you can get the round inside the reciever you probably can shoot it (as long as it fits the chamber of course)
    gary
     

  3. Zep

    Zep Well-Known Member

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    Gary hit with you with a great answer.

    What calibers and what prices.
     
  4. varmintH8R

    varmintH8R Well-Known Member

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    Here is an opinion from a reverse angle:

    I have two Coopers. Both were special orders (6mo+) and both are repeaters. A model 54 varminter in 22-250 and a model 52 Jackson Game in 280AI. Both shoot 1/2 MOA, no internet BS.

    I insisted on the repeaters for hunting reasons - in the field I thought having a few extra rounds in the box was a necessity. Maybe it is. BUT:

    - 100% of the time when target shooting I load one at a time (don't use the magazine).

    - I have never had a follow up shot in the field with either rifle.

    If I were presented with the right deal on a Cooper single shot action, I would not hesitate.
     
  5. krake22002

    krake22002 Active Member

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    I have a Cooper Phoenix 6.5x284 single shot. I love the rifle .5-.75 Moa to 1270 with the right shooter. I hunt the Oregon coast wanted a rifle for longrange clear cuts. I took a nice bull with it this hunting season. You can reload pretty fast once you get use to it and practice. I love the rifle and don't feel that Im at much of a disadvantage with the single shot. I almost didn't order it because it was a single shot but im happy i did
     
  6. Zep

    Zep Well-Known Member

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    By the way, you can go to the Cooper site and "build" your rifle. That will give you an idea of current pricing. And yes there should be a good discount for used, at least that is how I feel, very few people take care of a rifle the way I do.
     
  7. Rock Jock

    Rock Jock Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys for the feedback. I'm a bit leery on a single shot thinking that later on I might regret buying one. I've always been a repeater, semi auto guy.

    But as far as using it for hunting, I probably wouldn't. I have plenty of hunting rifles now that I can use.
    My main purpose would probably be paper shooting and maybe some prairie shooting.

    These Cooper rifles are selling on an auction. All are Varminters, and Montana Varminters, except for the .22 LR, and .22 WMR.
    The other calibers are, 22-250, 223 Ackely Improved, 222, 22BR, 204 Ruger, 243, and 20VT.

    Any suggestion on what calibers to go for? And what sort of price to pay for one. Considering they are in good to excellent condition.
    My thought on price would be $1000.00.
     
  8. Zep

    Zep Well-Known Member

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    If it were me and I knew the history of these rifles and I was happy with that, or better yet, they have seen very little use I would go for the 22-250 and 243. But I am on the east coast and those are the calibers for what I would hunt (woodchucks).

    As for single shot, that is part of the Cooper thing. I have one in 223 and I am very happy using it for woodchucks. I know my limits and I have been shooting for quite a few years. And as mentioned, if you reload you will probably need a longer over all cartridge length to get close to the lands than will fit in the magazine.

    One think to keep in mind, a Cooper is not a bench rifle, they come right out and say that in the owners manual. If you want something to put a lot of holes in paper I would look at something else. That's just my view.

    Price wise, 1000. might be low. Like I said in another post above, go to their web site and see what they cost new and go from there.
     
  9. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    let me tell you about those rimfires that Cooper sells. A close friend bought one for target shooting, and at the sametime another friend bought a Remington 40X. Both rifles were broken in the right way, and they must have went thru hundreds of boxes of ammo trying to find what shot and what didn't. I ended up with a lot of what they bought as it didn't work out for them. (all rimfires are that way). Tony's rifle came from the factory with a custom barrel (Kriefger or Shilen maybe) and a Jewell trigger in a very nice synthetic stock. Installed a nice Sightron scope on it (benchrest quality), and started winning matches all over the place. He drops by to tell me that on the following Saturday night he and the otherguy are going to shoot at the Borden matches that Bill Calfee and the boys do. Now you don't just go there with the idea of cleaning house! Tony planned on winning, and I knew better. But Tony either finished in 10th place or 13th place, and the guy with the 40x finished in 20th out of twenty spots. Needless to say it was a humbeling event for both of them. I was surprised Tony did so well. A couple weeks later he buys a Winchester 52D chamber reamer that was ground to Calfee's known spec. Did a barrel setback, and some minor stock work and major bolt work. The rifle comes in shooting very high twos and mid threes at fifty yards with Federal Olympic Gold Match ammo (the very best). Placed tenth down at Borden. He later comes up with the idea of installing a tuner on the barrel like everybody else uses down there. After a month of steady research I see how they work, and commence to design and build two slightly different ones (buy one, don't bother to build one!). After building it we figure out we have no idea how to mount it on the barrel without messing things up. I come up with a way, and we do it. He comes over to see me with a hand full of 50 yard targets he shot with the tuner installed. They all were right around .22" and many were in the .170" area. He goes back down to Borden for another beat down, and places fifth! In a Cooper! Calfee looked over the tuner very closely, and asked where it came from and just who made it (my head swole up). Tony tells him that we took the article he wrote in P.S. and followed all his instruction in ringing and slugging the barrel. The tuner was just our own design that we came up with. I sent Bill a set of drawings and he gave Tony sketches of a design that we needed to be looking at. I built two of them, but have no idea how well they worked as I have not talked to Tony in three years. To place fifth at Borden is doing something special. The rifles we shot against were all Calfee XP100 conversions and Anschutze with a couple Turbos and Harts in the mix. That's how good a Cooper rimfire target gun is!
    gary
     
  10. Zep

    Zep Well-Known Member

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    Gary - Nice post, thanks. I always like reading posts like yours.

    And by all means, try to get the 22LR and 22 WMR, at least I would.
     
  11. Rock Jock

    Rock Jock Well-Known Member

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    Yes, good reading!

    Thanks for all the feedback.

    I'll see how it turns out at the auction.
     
  12. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    I've been shooting a Cooper 520 which is a repeater in 6.5x284 for some time. Ii's extremely accurate with numerous kills between 500-1000 yards. I have never fired a second shot from the magazine. In hind site, at least for the type of hunting I do, I would have no issue if it was a single shot.
     
  13. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    90% of the folks here have no idea who Bill Calfee is, but trust me he's the goto guy for a 22 rimfire bench gun. Really one hell of a nice guy that will help you anytime you need help. He will call a spade when he see's a spade, unlike others. Has built Olympic winning rifles, and is one well respected guy.

    The Cooper 22 rimfire target rifle is the one you want. Look for an older one, as I heard the newer ones don't come with a Jewell trigger. Last time I heard he was (Calfee) working with somebody else on a new target action that was supposed to correct most all the faults in the current line of rimfire actions.
    gary
     
  14. Brucecaptain

    Brucecaptain New Member

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    I have a Cooper Phoenix .243, a single shot varmint rifle with a Leupold VX-7 3.5 - 14x varmint reticle scope on it. Use it mostly for targets and white tails. I like it a lot; but wouldn't walk a long ways with it.

    In the beginning... I think Cooper only made single shot rifles; then graduated to magazines several years ago. I can be corrected on that if I'm wrong.

    The heavy varmint rifle in a 26" barrel isn't made for toting around in the woods, but it's deadly from an elevated blind. The trick is to not have to shoot more than once!

    My experience is that if you shoot a deer and it takes off... multiple shots thereafter are simply to let all your buddies know that you can't shoot... and that you probably have to go track down a wounded animal, so don't shoot you!

    My .243 will shoot far better than I can shoot. My best group at 100 yds has been about 3/4", but it will do better than that if I could control my breathing.

    The trick to killing deer with 1 shot with a .243 is to shoot them in the ear. You can usually do that out to 200 yards without a lot of difficulty if it's not real windy. If you wait on a standing deer, they'll almost always turn their head sideways to you at some point. Howevere, this can mess up a good head.

    Bruce