Converting yards into clicks ????

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by stlbndr, Nov 20, 2011.

  1. stlbndr

    stlbndr Active Member

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    I just took a long range seminar that was very informative. I learned how to use the mill dots to mil an object (with a known target size) do the math and figure out how many yards away it is. I am so excited to have this new skill, only one problem I forget to ask the question. How do you convert the yards into clicks on the scope? I want to make a chart for my rifle so I can do the math, figure out the yards then look at the chart to know how many clicks to adjust the scope for the distance.
    So i'm throwing the question out there. How do I convert yards into clicks? My rifle is zeroed at 100 yards my target is at 200 yards my scopes adjustment is each click is 1/8" @ 100 yards. How many clicks do I adjust for 200 yards? If there is a chart already on the market that I could just bye that would be cool to. Any info would be helpful.
     
  2. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    I hope they also went over laser ranging, and use of ballistic software.
     

  3. stlbndr

    stlbndr Active Member

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    Yes we did go over all of that. But I must not of missed the part when he was talking about knowing how many clicks to adjust your turret after you know the yards.
     
  4. kcebcj

    kcebcj Well-Known Member

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    You need to purchase a good ballistic program or use one of the online systems. I think Berger has one that is a free download.

    If you just fool with the ballistic software many questions will pop up and as you answer those the adjustment of the scope will become the simple part. With all due respect...you are on the low end of the learning curve, but it's not brain surgery. Good luck!!
     
  5. Loner

    Loner Well-Known Member

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    A mil is 3.6 inches at 100 yards, 7.2 inches at 200 yards. Your scope is 1/4 inch (iphy) at 200
    yards, so 7.2 divided by .25 is 29 clicks. Now if your scope is 1/8 moa it will be slightly
    different. A mil is 3.438 moa at 100 yards. 7.2 / 1.047 inches (1 moa @ 100) = 6.87679
    x 4 = 27.5 clicks , take your pic, 27 or 28.

    Now, instead of using a mildot, use a moa or iphy reticle to match your turrets (clicks)
    or get a scope that has .1 mil turrets and a mil reticle. You will save a lot of converting.
    Or get a pda or itouch and put an app like "shooter" in it, it will tell you all three at
    the same time. And for ten bucks, cheaper than a half a box of shells.

    A mildot master may also have the conversions to moa, I don't know, you would have to
    check.

    But first you are going to have to know what your scope clicks are in the real world.
    Put a Yard stick straight up and down at exactly one hundred yards from the end of
    the scope, no fudging. Mount the gun (or scope) in a gun vise and start clicking your
    turrets and counting. Find out how many clicks it takes to move up the yard stick and
    record your measurements. Scopes are commonly off. Yours may move 1.1 inches in
    8 clicks or .95 inches, but you need to know. Then your are ready to dial in true amount for your rig. Otherwise you are going to spend some ammo correcting what
    you could correct on paper.
     
  6. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    stlbndr,

    Before we had ballistic programs, we had to just shoot at a distance and measure the drop from the aiming point.

    The key here is to use a tall taget and aim at the top (paste an aiming point on the top edge of the target). If the range is beyond 400 yds, with a 100 yd zero; you'll probably want to attach a surveyors stick with an aiming point on it (so you have enough room for the bullet to drop and still land on the paper). A tall peice of cardboard works too.

    Ranging with the reticle will get you close enough out to 500 yds with a flat shooting cartridge most of the time. The key is knowing the real true size of the target. Laser rangefinders work much more accurately if you have time to use one.

    Once you know how many inches low you are hitting at any given distance, then you can figure the clicks involved.

    Example: 25 inches low at 500 yds..........25 X 8 (8 clicks per inch/100) = 200.
    Now, take the 200 and divide by 5 (for 500 yds)..........200/5=40 clicks up.

    50 inches low at 600 yds..........50X8=400, 400/6=67 clicks up.

    This should work for you until you can get a ballistic program or enough data to use one.
    This should also get you close enough to fine tune your click count. Keep in mind that not all scopes move the poi the exact amount anticipated.

    Good Luck,
     
  7. ken snyder

    ken snyder Well-Known Member

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    There sure are a lot of good things to be said about the new Ballistic programs. Myself, I have found It a lot easier to make my own charts by shooting for actual results. The difference that I find is that it is much better to make charts conform to actual results than to try to make the results conform to a program. I don't click because one of the things that I do not like is shooting a scope that is not optically centered. Mil Rad dots are already very accurate and don't need much help at all. I'm pretty sure my ideas are a lot different than a lot of folks. I keep my scopes optically centered and on my rifles that are actually long range rifles I use rings and mounts that bring the center dot to an appropriate elevation setting for the rifles intended yardages and then use the dots. No fuss no hassle, its already in the dots.
     
  8. stlbndr

    stlbndr Active Member

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    Thank you guys for all the info. There is a G7 Ballistic calculator on this site and it's free. I put in all the info that I know of and found out that it would help if I know my true data for my round to get an accurate chart. I put in some basic numbers just to see how the callculator works and it will do a full chart to what ever yards you want and will print it on a small range card for you. After playing with all the settings for a while I found the button that converts yards to clicks. I'm going to get all my basic info, plug it into the program, print out a chart and try it out at the range. I'll let you all know how it goes.
     
  9. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    stlbndr, you can't really keep everything 'optically centered' for 'intended yardages' in LR hunting. This, because intended ranges covers all possibles, don't matter if you dial or hold-off.
    And Mildots are anything but precise. They are actually the lowest of all aiming resolutions, and nowhere near the accuracy of laser ranging.
    Then, with charts by 'actual shooting results'; well those results have yet to be determined for every ballistic condition in the field. This is a local adjustment when you get there & before taking a shot.

    LR hunting is completely different than target shooting at known size plates at known distances plus or minus whatever the conditions cause..
     
  10. nfhjr62

    nfhjr62 Well-Known Member

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  11. ken snyder

    ken snyder Well-Known Member

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    Hi Mikecr its a lot easier than most would imagine. I use the center dot for 700 yd zero. two dots above it and 2 dots below it Each of those dots are spaced 36 inches apart at 1000 yds. thats a total of 108 inches elevation adjustment at 700 with out ever leaving the scope. 1/8th clicks only have a certainty of 1.25 inches at a grand. An eye can very easily divide a length down into 1/16 of a segment or 2.25 inches. only 1 inch difference between the two. Scopes don't rack up and down perfectly or go back to true zero, Mil rad spacing isn't perfect either but both are very good with a decent scope. With the real possibility of miscounting and or forgetting. It is my opinion that clicking is the least accurate of the two methods. All is well with dotting particularly if it is remembered that the scope can still click if needed! It is also very beneficial to keep the scope optically zeroed for intended ranges. I know it is a different thought that goes back to before rangefinders and computers but with the modern equipment of today it is better than ever and it was good!
     
  12. joseph

    joseph Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Nov 22, 2011
  13. ken snyder

    ken snyder Well-Known Member

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    Crud, I also wrote that they do very good. I know that people are selecting the new video game approach to hunting, It is very popular and with enough practice it will work! I don't suppose that the older ways will appeal to everyone and neither would I expect them too. Here is my analogy and hopefully it will not resemble anyone. Spot game animal, look at it with binoculars, get out range finder bounce it off of stuff other than the animal, oh crud it wont bounce back any further than 700 yds today , oh crud the batteries are dead. look at the paste on chart on the side of my rifle that does not include the actual yardage to be shot. measure the wind and calculate drift. Crank on the knobs, Dawg gone it was that eighteen clicks. Mr. Elk come back I'm not through yet - Aw fudge just shoot heck with the level, what happened A laughable scenario but true to the point! Until recently when we became keyboard vegetables no one had a problem with numbers. We had no problem in remembering a dozen or so 10 digit phone numbers on top of SS number bank nunbers addresses and every other number society hands out. I don't see any problem with remembering a few simple Dot and windage rules. Definately just my opinion and nothing to judge shooting ability by.
     
  14. Loner

    Loner Well-Known Member

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    You have to range the animal, I love my scopes but a range finder is a faster easier
    way. Anything over 500 yards or so isn't usually aware of my presence so being in a
    rush isn't paramount. Getting the yardage, wind and slope is. When I was young you
    only heard or read of a few long competition shooters taking game at the distances
    we see today that are maybe not common, but are certainly done by layman. It's
    the equipment that has gotten better, not the shooters per say.