CED Millenium 2 Chronograph Advice Needed

Discussion in 'Equipment Discussions' started by Doug in Alaska, Apr 3, 2010.

  1. Doug in Alaska

    Doug in Alaska Well-Known Member

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    I've had my CED Millennium 2 out twice. It works very well, if it is set up perfectly. It is a real pain to align perfectly and it seems I have to shoot very low (scary low) over the sensors to prevent error readings. Does anyone have advice? Do you have this same problem?
    Thanks
     
  2. mo

    mo Well-Known Member

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    yes get the inferred sky screens. It makes a big difference!
     

  3. Doug in Alaska

    Doug in Alaska Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, I should have mentioned I'm using the inferred sky screens.
     
  4. mo

    mo Well-Known Member

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    Well scratch that comment then... I can shoot right through the middle, and get a reading every time. The green light on the IR should be on if the screens are getting power, but their really hard see see unless it's low light. Hook up and take in a dark room, and see if their on.
     
  5. Doug in Alaska

    Doug in Alaska Well-Known Member

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    Both green lights are always on and I'm using the battery pack. The chronograph is always in the shade at the range where I shoot due to covered shooting benches. I'm also still shooting with snow and ice on the ground. I wonder if this could be the problem? I may give CED a call next week.
     
  6. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    Snow on the ground under the unit can be problematic. The light reflects off the snow and hits the under side of the bullet, which the sensors then see. It masks the shadow (loss of light) normally created by the bullet passing over the sensors. I sometimes set pieces of cardboard on the snow under the sensors to reduce snow glare. I don't know if your unit is under the roof also, or outside the shooting roof. Best to be kept out from under roof so the noise waves aren't so intense on the sensors.

    There are some more tips from CED at this link:

    CED M2 Chronograph
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2010
  7. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    Won't work most of the time.
     
  8. Doug in Alaska

    Doug in Alaska Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the help guys! I'll give CED a call and see if they offer any solutions for us cold weather shooters.
     
  9. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    I've been shooting over snow all winter without problems, so it doesn't always cause problems. But I'm shooting over an Oehler 33 and a PACT Pro, set up in tandem. If it's sunny out with snow on the ground I lay a dark tarp or cardboard down on the snow to reduce light reflection off the snow under the sensors. If it's cloudy out I just set up and shoot right over the snow.

    But snow will increase the chances of problems.
     
  10. Doug in Alaska

    Doug in Alaska Well-Known Member

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    Well maybe snow isn't the problem because the chronograph is always in the shade. I shoot at Birchwood range.
     
  11. Doug in Alaska

    Doug in Alaska Well-Known Member

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    Ok, for anyone interested, here's an update. Yesterday, I contacted CED about my problems with the M2 chronograph and quite frankly, the customer support has been phenomenal. I spoke with a very nice lady (Supaporn). She asked lots of questions, offered advice and told me to expect an email message within the next few hours. When I got home from work, the email had arrived with several attached files and a drawing.

    Early this morning I received another email message from Charles, explaining that he is currently traveling internationally and apologizing for the delayed response. He also offered tips but asked several question regarding shooting conditions, set-up, temperatures, speeds, etc. I answered his questions and he responded within an hour. He thinks the distance I'm setting the sensors from the muzzle is to close. I won't get a chance to give his suggestions a try until April 16 but he asked I contact him immediately following my next range session.

    I guess I'm not familiar with kind of tech support. This is great and expect with this kind of support the problem will be sorted out shortly. I highly recommend this company when you begin shopping for your next chronograph. Amazing!!!!!!
     
  12. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    How close had you set the sensors to the muzzle of your firearm? Cartridge you were firing?
     
  13. Doug in Alaska

    Doug in Alaska Well-Known Member

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    I had the sensors set eight feet from the muzzle. The manual says seven to ten feet to start. I was working up .22-250AI loads so I wouldn't think the muzzle blast excessive.
     
  14. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't expect that to be the issue either with the 22-250, but I always keep my skyscreens more about 12' from the muzzle no matter the cartridge - so I don't have personal experience at the closer spacings. When I shoot RUM class cartridges I maintain the greatest separation distance my cables will allow - which is around 12-13' - because I have the forward skyscreens separated 6 feet from the nearer skyscreens. But I've had no problems chronographing my 25 RUM. If any sane cartridge's muzzle blast would shock the skyscreens - that should be it.