Case Lube and tumbling questions

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Big_Tex22, Nov 9, 2006.

  1. Big_Tex22

    Big_Tex22 Active Member

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    Hello every one-
    just wondered what the most common case lube ya'll use for full length resizing and neck sizing. And maybe what I'm a little more curious about is cleaning off case lube after you run them through the dies. I probably don't do a good enough job, and wonder how much not getting them wiped off enough can factor in on your chambers and brass. I use one shot, pretty simple application but when I'm going through a lot of reloading and resizing at once, I don't put a lot of effort in the wiping off.
    Second question(s), do ya'll tumble your brass, when, for how long, what media and polishing compound. What are the advantages and disadvantages? I've heard people say clean brass is like a clean car, looks nice but doesn't run any better, but I would think cleaner brass has got to make for a smoother running chamber, right?
    Thanks for your help
     
  2. YZEATER

    YZEATER Well-Known Member

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    picking up a tumbler tomorrow. i'll be listening also.
     

  3. coupalr

    coupalr Well-Known Member

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    I wipe the necks with JB then lube them on a RCBS pad with RCBS case lube then resize, clean the primer pocket and tumble them in treated corn cob media for about 2 hours. Take them out put them in a rag (old towel) roll them around a bit to get the dust from tumbling off and then put them in the ammo box mouth down and poke out the media from the flash holes and they are ready to go.
     
  4. CatShooter

    CatShooter Well-Known Member

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    I use "RCBS-2" on a Lyman pad for full sizing. It's water soluble and easy to clean off with a damp rag - if I size a bunch (hundreds++), I just wash them in water and dry them with a hair dryer.

    For neck sizing, I don't use anything.
     
  5. rotorhead

    rotorhead Well-Known Member

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    I only use imperial sizing wax put out by redding most places have it . It wipes right off and it goes a long way. To me there is no other choice and I havew not ever gotten a case stuck with it. It is very clean to use as well. I then arm all my dies with carbide sizing buttons for the inside , they require no lube also produced by redding. I have a couple of RCBS die and I have been able to adapt them to the buttons


    As far as the case cleaning I use a Dillon 500 vibratory cleaner with there compriable seperator They are a little more money but I have had mine for several years and never had a problem out of it. Its a good Santa Claus gift if you know what I mean. http://dillonprecision.com/template/p.cfm?maj=16&min=0&dyn=1&
    Hope this helps

    RH
     
  6. 41mag

    41mag Well-Known Member

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    If I am doing a huge batch of pistol cases I use the Lyman spray lube, for rifle cases ditto on the Imperial. I was using the RCBS but after getting recommendations from folks here I tried the Imperial. Wished I had known about it years ago.

    For cleaning, I am using a Midway vibratory cleaner with corn cob to polish or walnut to clean the really cruddy stuff. I mix in about a half teaspoon of Flitz to the corncob and it puts a real fine shine on the cases and keep them from tarnishing up so bad after being handled several times or carried in less than ideal conditions.

    IF you got several buddies that also use tumblers you can pick up the crushed corn cob and walnut for about 18 bucks for 50 pounds at just about any sand blasting supply place. IT will give you a several year supply very cheaply.
     
  7. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    My favorite lube it NO LUBE. I pretty much stick to my Lee Collet neck dies and they need no lube on the cases.
     
  8. MagMan

    MagMan Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    If I am doing a huge batch of pistol cases I use the Lyman spray lube

    [/ QUOTE ]

    You don't use carbide pistol dies?
     
  9. Bart B

    Bart B Well-Known Member

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    I've tried all sorts of pads and spray methods to lube cases. None produced very uniform case headspace (as measured with case gages); got between .002 and .003-inch spreads with a variety of rimless and belted bottle neck cases. Then someone suggested I tumble my deprimed then cleaned cases in a foam lined tumbler with a few drops of case lube on the foam. I've used a 50-50 mixture of STP engine oil treatment and Hoppe's No. 9 bore cleaner as a lube forever. Tumbling cases to lube them seems to put a more uniform coat of lube on the cases resulting in a .001-inch spread in sized case headspace.
     
  10. Big_Tex22

    Big_Tex22 Active Member

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    So how many of you don't lube if you're only neck sizing and have the carbide expander buttons?

    So walnut media is better for the real cruddy stuff, is that about the only difference or advantage?

    If you tumble after lubing and full length sizing, I suppose that would remove all the wax, right?

    And last, does lube and wax build up pretty bad in chambers if you get lazy wiping it off?
     
  11. arthurj

    arthurj Well-Known Member

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    I know one thing, do not use the hornady non hazardous spray lube. I just lubed and sized 50 cases and threw them in the tumbler. After an hour I opened it to see how the lube was coming off, its almost like the powder in the media has bonded to the case. I don't know how the hell I will get these cases cleaned!
     
  12. Bart B

    Bart B Well-Known Member

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    I first deprime fired cases, clean out their necks with a bore brush to get rid of powder fouling, then tumble them in rice or walnut hulls to clean the cases. Then I shush them in a large towel to get rid of all the surface dust.

    Next, I tumble them in a foam lined tumbler to lube them followed by full-length sizing them in a die whose neck is lapped out so an expander ball isn't needed.

    Finally, I wash all the cases in mineral spirits to clean all the lube off and that stuff doesn't leave any residue after it evaporates. This way, there's nothing on the case to get put on the chamber walls.
     
  13. 41mag

    41mag Well-Known Member

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    MagMan,

    Yes I use carbide pistol dies, but over the years, I have found that just a light spray of the Lyman stuff works really well. When I do a batch for any particular caliber, it is generally 500+ at a time. Might also have nickle cases mixed in as well. Then I trim them all, tumble to remove any lube or what not, and then bag them up till I need them. I generally only load fifty or a hundered at a time. Some calibers I have several 1 gallon bags of cases ready to load, some only a coffee can or so.

    Might not be needed, but it makes me feel better doing it, and the case necks don't seem to split as much as they did before I started.
     
  14. 41mag

    41mag Well-Known Member

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    So walnut media is better for the real cruddy stuff, is that about the only difference or advantage?

    The Walnut shell is a more agressive cleaner than the corn cob. IT will polish but not to the same extent.

    If you tumble after lubing and full length sizing, I suppose that would remove all the wax, right?

    Yes generally before I resize anything it has been through at least one round of media, which ever was needed. Then after sizing it goes straight into the corn cob. This generally only takes about 15 or so minutes and I am setting up the next step or getting the powder measure set while doing so.

    And last, does lube and wax build up pretty bad in chambers if you get lazy wiping it off?

    I haven't noticed any significant build up, but I have noticed that some loads which normally shoot really well do not shoot as tight or have varied velocities for no other aparent reason.

    This is in my rifles which are for the most part all factory. The only thing I have ever owned custom is the .270 AM and it gets the same treatment.