Canvas wall tent?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by larson1, Nov 18, 2005.

  1. larson1

    larson1 Member

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    As this is a hunting forum, I figure a few of you have spent a night or two in a canvas wall tent. I am looking at several different wall tents and options, any input from any of you as to what you like about your tent or wish you had different might help? I am especially wondering about a rear window or second door option? Is a 14x16 big enough for 4 guys?
     
  2. sniper2

    sniper2 Well-Known Member

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    I have slept in the one with a insulated area for stove pipe, we had a sheep herders stove in ours very nice if you have a few pieces of green wood for the long burn. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smirk.gif
     

  3. srhaggerty

    srhaggerty Well-Known Member

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    What time of year are you hunting or planning to use it. I archery hunt elk so it can be hot. When that temp hits 70 midday I want the second door to circulate air.
     
  4. TOM H

    TOM H Well-Known Member

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    Best think I can say is lay out 4 cots in an area about the size of tent you want. I've got a 10x20 over 20 years old and works OK for 3 guys plus gear wish I had an extra 4 or 6 ft wide. I got my tent before they had those metal frame but I got one and sure is nice. Rear window would be OK but extra door depending on where you set up may not work and depending on weather if you don't have a cook tent etc may have to do some cooking in tent so have to consider that. Well good luck.
     
  5. sniper2

    sniper2 Well-Known Member

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    Winter,cold weather!
     
  6. realbuff

    realbuff Member

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    In another thread here I recomended Canvas Cabins from the Portland area. They are great. I haven't checked in the last 5 years, but I assume they are still in business. 12 x 15 will sleep 4 comfortably if you don't cook and have a table in the tent, 3 if you do. I use Roll-A-Cot. They are compact and pretty light and real comfortable. I'd have 2 doors and a window. Insulation around the stove pipe hole. Have them put mesh pockets on the walls for flashlites, etc. A rope stretched from corner to corner makes a good clothes hanger/dryer. Canvas Cabin has a very good pole setup, the best I've seen. If you are going to pack in a long ways horseback I would use pole timber though. Its not difficult to do. When we are hunting the same area year after year we cache the poles and use them again. You can buy a plastic tarp at Wall Mart that is the right size for a floor if you have room to pack it. One note, don't ever put the tent away for the year while it is damp. You'll have pieces when you get ready for next year.
     
  7. silvertip-co

    silvertip-co Well-Known Member

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    Davis Tent & Awning in Denver build the finest wall tents in America and can answer all your questions. Give them a call. My experience is a 14x16 is large enough for four guys.
     
  8. slymule

    slymule Well-Known Member

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    Silvertip has it right, give Davis Tent and Awning a call. Their website is Wall Tents, Canvas Tents, canvas wall tent, canvas wall tent frames,. The 14x16' tent is about perfect for four guys. It won't be big enough to set up a table to eat at inside, but you'll have room for everybody to have their own camp chair to eat at, plus its small enough to easily heat in the coldest weather. I have a 10x12', 12x14', and a 16x20' - all made by Davis Tent. I wish I would of initially bought the 14x16'. The 16x20' would be nice and roomy for four guys, but its alot harder to keep warm when its really cold. I'd just opt for the back window and not the door, the window is plenty big enough to allow air flow through the tent when its warm out. They all come with the asbestos shield surrounding the stove pipe vent, sod cloth,ridge pole sleeves, zippered doors, side ropes and tensioners, and tent stakes. If you're going to order it with a frame, go with the internal frame and just order the angle kit. You can buy 1" conduit from Home Depot and cut the poles yourself saving you a good bit of money. Another money saving way is to just buy a cheap come-a-long, run the cable thru the ridge pole sleeves and set it up between two trees, then just go to Home Depot and buy 1/2" conduit and cut them yourself to go from the top of the stake to the grommet on the top of the side wall, this will support your sidewalls.

    Having used many different kinds of stoves I've found the easiest setup, if you can drive to where you'll be camping, is buy one of those 30,000 btu ventfree propane heaters with the automatic thermostat (they're sweet) about $200., then get you a 100# propane bottle and you'll be set - no cutting wood, getting up in the wee hours of the morning to stoke the fire.
     
  9. RockyMtnMT

    RockyMtnMT Official LRH Sponsor

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    I use a 30 gal barrel stove in mine. It'll cook you out. Build the stove your self w/ a kit from Volgelzang. Don't use a 50 gal barrel, you can't burn it low enough. The 30 gal is large enough to burn all night.

    I don't like the frame that I have for my tent. Mine is a ridge pole w/ two legs on each end. Then wall stakes that go on the out side of the tent down the sides and pull tight w/ ropes and stakes. I would prefer to have a frame that is all internal, and has a rafter style. I think it will do a little better in the wind.

    Check with the different makers, for a material called "realite" (I think this is correct). This material is waterproof and does not mold. You still do not want to put it away wet. If it happens it won't rot. Down side is they are a little hotter in hot weather. I personally don't find this to be a problem.

    The size you are talking about should work fine for 4 cots, don't use the huge cots. We set up a second tent for cooking and socializing. Wood stove in each.

    Tried to put in an image, but can't get it to work, I better call 7mm in WA. for help. If I can get it to work I'll put it up.

    Good luck, Steve
     
  10. WesB

    WesB Well-Known Member

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    This is the info I posted on another thread
    I did a TON of research before I bought my first wall tent. There are many different options from different manufactures. There are also many types of materials to choose from. I personaly prefer a Sunforger material for my tents, it's water and mildew resistent. In our guiding business we use tents from three different manufactures. We have a 14X16 from Davis Tents. It's constructed very well but has a few minor things I don't care for. One the door is a little too short for my liking. Two they use a fiberglass stove jack that will burn and unravel. Three the door does not come with weather flaps, though you can have them added for an additional charge. Four they use chain stitching on their seams, with chain stitching the entire seam can unravel if you pull the stitching, just like on a feed bag. Other then that they are very good tents. I also use a 15'X18' tent from Dave Ellis in Colorado, he's a great guy to work with and will make whatever changes you want. This is an excellent tent with one minor item , he doesn't completely roll his seams. I had him make it out of 12 oz Sunforger material. He uses a lock stitch on his seams. The door comes with a zipper and storm flaps inside and outside , he uses D-rings to tie them shut, but I had him add straps with quick release buckles to close the flaps. I also had him add a rear door, just in case a bear comes in the front door I can run out the back. He uses a silicone stove jack. The 15'X18' may seem large but we can sleep 6 guys with a stove comfortably or sleep 4 guys with a stove and still have room for all of our cooking equipment. My other tent is manufactured by Cylinder Stoves in Cedar City Utah. They used to have Dave Ellis make their tents but started building their own. It is a 12'X15' and will sleep two with a stove and cooking equipment comfortably. I believe this is the best manufactured tent I have. It comes standard with two doors and they completely roll their seams so you don't have any exposed edges to unravel and they are stitched with a lock stitch, and they use a silicone stove jack. They also use D-rings to tie their storm flaps inside and out, but I had them add the straps and buckles on mine. It's made from 10 oz Sunforger material. I had them install two windows for better ventilation. For frames I prefer an outside frame over a rafter frame kit. You can purchase them from the manufacture of your tent or like I do make your own for a lot less money using electrical conduit and top rail material. Like I said what ever tent you decide to use make sure it's made with Sunforger material. It's water and mildew resistant and it's a LOT stronger then canvas. I wouldn't own any tent made with canvas whether it's treated or not. Canvas tents have to be COMPLETELY dry before you put them away or they will mildew and rot in a very short time. With the Sunforger you can pack them home if they are wet and they won't mildew but you still have to dry them completely before you store them. I also prefer stoves made by Cylinder Stoves. They are made in different sizes to fit whatever size tent you have and are very heavy duty. Hope this helps.
    [​IMG]
    Wes
     
  11. RockyMtnMT

    RockyMtnMT Official LRH Sponsor

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    Wes,

    That is the same style of frame that I have. Why do you like it better than the internal frame? I was thinking of changing, thinking that the internal would do better in the wind.

    Steve
     
  12. WesB

    WesB Well-Known Member

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    Steve
    We've used the rafter frames and they work fine. I like the external frame better because they are lighter weight. My 15X18 external frame weighs 76 pounds compared to my rafter frame that weighs 130 pounds. I also think they are easier to set up by one person. I can get my tent stretched tighter with them too. I use 1/2" electrical conduit for my wall poles. I cut them tight to the height of my walls so when they are staked out I can use the ropes and "A" frame poles at both ends to get the tent really tight. A 15' "A" frame from Cylinder Stoves costs $265 plus tax and shipping, and a 15X18 rafter frame is $384 plus T&S. I can make an "A" frame for around $150 so they're a little cheaper too.
    Wes
     
  13. RockyMtnMT

    RockyMtnMT Official LRH Sponsor

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    I make a trip to eastern MT every year, and seems that every year we have a wind storm that pushes into the 50mph or better. It sucks when you have to salvage a camp in a wind storm. Been there done that. Any more I have a hard time sleeping when the wind kicks up, for fear that my house is going to start moving. I anchor one end of the tent to a tree so it can not leave, but the walls will start to move inward.

    I will not bother spending the money if in your experience the internal frame is not any better for the wind. I can see the advantage to the external for uneven ground.

    Thanks, Steve
     
  14. WesB

    WesB Well-Known Member

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    Steve
    I'm not sure how your external frame works but with mine it helps to hold the bottom of the walls down. My tents have grommets along the bottom of the walls and corresponding grommets at the top of the walls. I drive a spike through the bottom grommets leaving about 2 inches above the ground then set my pole over the spike and then insert an eye bolt, to which I've spliced my rope, through the grommet at the top into the pole. Like I said I cut my poles tight to the height of the walls so this holds the walls really tight. When these are staked out the walls aren't going anywhere.
    Wes