Canted Bases For Scope

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by iSnipe, Nov 23, 2008.

  1. iSnipe

    iSnipe Well-Known Member

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    Reading a thread I see reference to using a canted base for scopes on long range shooting. I think I understand this concept, but want to clarify my thoughts...

    Isn't using a canted base just mean to place some sort of shim under one of the scope mounts to get the scope to sit slightly canted?

    What if someone said "20 MOA", meaning their scope is set at that cant, what specifically does that mean? I understand MOA, but not for the cant. Does it mean the shim would cant the scope enough to have it impact a difference of 20" at 100 yards?

    Wouldn't the cant for long range shooting be done exclusively on the back scope mount to get the front to prop down?

    One last thing, I'm saying "shim", but think it's more than that. What exactly are you guys using or doing to cant your scope?

    Thanks,

    iSnipe :)
     
  2. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    This will help you to understand the process. Don't use shims.

    Click here to read all this great info. about that!!!
     

  3. iSnipe

    iSnipe Well-Known Member

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    Hello Eaglet!

    Looks like I have the jist of the idea, so I'm in the ballpark anyway.

    By the looks of that link you posted, I should be able to get a strong understanding of what it is with 3 pages of posts to read through. :D

    Thank you for your help!

    iSnipe
     
  4. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    First thing to do before anything else, is to zero the rifle at 100 yards (or some other value if you wish). Then carefully spin the dial up to the top counting as you go and record how much elevation you have available. After that return the dial to your zero setting. Next carefully spin it down to bottom counting as you go and record how much you have available.

    You can't shim/cant the base more than you have adjustment available. If you only have 10 MOA of down available then you cannot shim/cant 20 MOA and still zero your rifle. So, if you are already close to the bottom of the scope you will not benefit from shimming. If on the other hand you are at the middle or close to the top then shimming can help.
     
  5. iSnipe

    iSnipe Well-Known Member

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    Buffalobob,

    Makes sense. I was thinking similar in the back of my mind about how much elevation I will have to work with. However, I would have not thought about figuring it out before hand. Great tip!

    Thank you very much for your valued input. That'll help this ol' boy out when I get setup for long range.

    iSnipe
     
  6. 1000300rum

    1000300rum Member

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    Not sure I understand the rear mount being higher than the front. How will this help in long range? It seems that this would use all your adjustment in the up direction and would leave you unable to raise the crosshairs in the proper direction for long range.
    If someone would be so kind as to expain this!
     
  7. wklman

    wklman Well-Known Member

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    Learned this the hard way with a zeiss scope and warne 20 moa base on my weatherby.
     
  8. Bullet bumper

    Bullet bumper Well-Known Member

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    You can still zero your rifle at a longer range . That is the whole purpose of a canted base . You just may not be able to zero at closer range like before .
    Why fit a canted base if you want to zero at close range .
    It all depends on how much cant you use and how much elevation the scope has as to how close you can Zero but it is not good to have the scope zeroing at the extremes of it's adjustment .
     
  9. gamehawker

    gamehawker Well-Known Member

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    Ditto, but the rifle was a Remington 700 with a EGW 20 MOA base and a Zeiss Scope.

    I had to switch out to a EGW 15 MOA base.
     
  10. greggy99712

    greggy99712 New Member

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    I'm kinda confused myself. I'm almost out of clicks to go up at 200 yds. seems to me if the rear of the base was higher than the front I'd have to have MORE clicks up to get back to my zero. It seems it should be the other way around,with the front higher.
     
  11. greggy99712

    greggy99712 New Member

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    well, sorry I think I just figgered it out in what's left of my mind. I see now how it works I think:rolleyes: