Can anyone HELP?!?

Discussion in 'Varmint Hunting' started by on3toughmidg3t, Jan 2, 2012.

  1. on3toughmidg3t

    on3toughmidg3t Member

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    Is a bull barrel necessary for a prairie dog hunt? I plan to purchase a 22-250 caliber rifle but would prefer not to buy it with a bull barrel because this hunt is just a one time deal. I mainly want to have it for predator hunting every now and then. Can anyone shine some light on my situation? I also dont have a large price range; about $600 would be my limit. The TC Venture Predator with a Bushnell banner 6-24x40 is the top runnings on my list. Is this a good idea? gun)Feel free to email me at on3cheezyburg3r@aim.com.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2012
  2. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Don't load it too hot and

    Don't shoot it too hot

    Thus if there are a ton of PDS and you're into throwing lots of lead, you'll need at least 2 maybe 3 rifles. It takes a while for barrels to cool.

    My experience with 22-250s loaded hot is that as few as 1500 shots may more barrel end of life.

    The heavy barrel will be a bear for shooting moving predators and for carrying.
     

  3. on3toughmidg3t

    on3toughmidg3t Member

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    We plan to have 8 guys and we all planned on taking a .22 along with a 22-250. So I figured that with more people shooting, that would mean less shots per person. Unless they spread us out so much?
     
  4. strombeckj

    strombeckj Well-Known Member

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    Barrel heat affects the accuracy of the barrel, hence the reason for a thicker more ridged piece of steal on a varmint gun which will shoot long stings. Otherwise called barrel whip. I would consider a savage predator package, it may be more that you want to spend but not by a hole lot. It carries a med weight barrel and is shorter which will help reduce the weight. The other option would be to go with a different caliber which produces less heat like a .223 in a fast twist for the bigger 60-75gr bullets on coyotes.

    Good luck in you quest.

    Jon
     
  5. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

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    I think taking a 22 along is a great idea, it will certainly help, you may need to slow your pace a little for a lighter barrel but not a big deal you will have tons of fun, and playing around with the 22 will be just as fun as your waiting for your 22-250 to cool
     
  6. 8 SNAKE

    8 SNAKE Well-Known Member

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    In addition to barrel heat concerns, you also want a rifle that's heavy enough to maintain sight picture after the shots. You'll be pretty disappointed if you miss out on all of the action every time you squeeze the trigger.
     
  7. Jay03

    Jay03 Well-Known Member

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    If this is a one time deal and then its off to predator hunting then definently buy the regular sporter barrel IMHO. Ask me why I think this..... :rolleyes:

    I have 2 heavy barrel rifles one in .223 and one 22-250 and they get takin along predator hunting zero times a year now that I have a .223 with a LVSF barrel profile and a very lightweight lone wolf stock. I once thought the heavy barrel was superior in all ways when hunting varmints and predators but after a few years I learned my lesson. If only shooting varmints and rabbits I would pack the heavies but I enjoy calling predators way to much to sit still long enough to shoot varmints. Heck! even if I do any varmint hunting I walk from hill to hill or rock bluff and shoot a few whatevers and then walk to the next so the scoped 6.5lb rifle and set of shooting sticks is still my choice critter getter.

    By the way... anyone want to buy a remington PSS .223 with a 26in fluted barrel, HS stock and burris black diamond 4x16-50?? :D Its has shot in the .3's and .4's with the right hand loads.
     
  8. tuck2

    tuck2 Well-Known Member

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    I have sporter weight 22-250 Rem and 220 Swift which now are only used for limited shooting coyote hunting. The barrels of the two rifles heated up fast when shooting prairie dogs. I live in prairie dog country and have two varmint heavy barrel 223 Rem rifles but since getting a .204 Ruger target varmint rifle I dont use them very much. If I were to do a lot of hunting on foot I would get a sporter weight 204 rifle. I like the lower recoil of the 204 when there is a lot of shooting at prairie dogs.
     
  9. isaaccarlson

    isaaccarlson Well-Known Member

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    You don't need a bull barrel. I would get a standard barrel and use mild loads. Most of your standard loads are WAY overkill on PD's. Use a light load and let em rip on the shots over 2-300 yards. Use the 22 for anything closer to give your barrel time to cool.
     
  10. MachV

    MachV Well-Known Member

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    Most of my doggin guns have a varmint to bull barrel on them but the one that gets the most use these days is a very lite barreled CZ 527 American in 223.
    The key to its popuarity is that it does not walk all that bad for a sporter barrel when it heats up and it cools a lot faster than a varmint contoured barrel!!
    Had a 22-250 Winchester featherlite many years ago that I thought would make a good preditor/calling gun=WRONG The gun only liked a few loads and all of them where at 223 velocities.
    I might buy a good friend a 22-250 sporter for doggin (Fun if your the spotter) but unless you video the action you aint gonna see much of it pullin the trigger!
    A 22lr is great if the dogs have not seen much shooting but on most dogtowns they will see very limited use IMHO