Calling kirby allen!

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by tbrown9124, Aug 19, 2008.

  1. tbrown9124

    tbrown9124 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    45
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    I have a question about making 22 cal off of a '06 case with minmum body taper and a 40 degree neck. Could this work with 75grain or larger bullets like the 100gr wildcats? Or is this simply to much to ask of a 22cal bullet.
     
  2. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

    Messages:
    6,848
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2004
    I will keep this simple, TO MUCH CASE!!!

    A 100 gr bullet would help alot if it could handle this velocity level. In my testing, the 100 and 107 gr ULD RBBTs needed a 1-7 twist to stabilize, only problem, in this twist rate, your limited to around 3100-3200 fps max before they come apart.

    The 06 case is just more then needed. In fact, a 22-250 AI will get you this velocity level with these bullet weights.

    For lighter bullets, its just to much case capacity to be practical. For bullets from 55 to 80 grains, something like a 22-6mm will do anything the 06 case will do easily!!!

    I played with a similar capacity 22 wildcat when developing my 224 Allen Magnum. I will admit it was not a successful project. If we had a 100 gr bullet that would take the velocity it would be a totally different story but we do not have any that would work really well at a practical price.

    If it were me, I would not go any larger then a 22-6mm AI capacity chambering. Even the 22-284 is just to large in my opinion for the bullets we have right now.

    Hope this helps. To be blunt, spend your money on another project, this one will be very frustrating. Now if you bump up to 6mm, totally different story!!! Amazing what 19 thou in bullet diameter gets us for stouter bullets that will take the speed.
     

  3. jwp475

    jwp475 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,595
    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2005
    A TSX bullet would stand all of the velocity that you could give it
     
  4. tbrown9124

    tbrown9124 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    45
    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2008
    It was just a dream i had i have a 243 catbird that blows jackets, i was just wondering if you had played with it, if it worked i was just thinking of the possibility, the 224 clark i have is kind of a finicky pain but it shoots when it likes the load. The problem i have had with any cal below 25 is that bullet jackets and cores were to soft or just poorly constructed and either puked their guts out easy or were just easy to deform at fairly high velocity. But i am new to swaging my own copper bullets and would like to learn about making a tough high bc bullet that would hold up to high velocities.
     
  5. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

    Messages:
    6,848
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2004
    JWP475,

    You are correct, already played that game. 75 grains is just not enough bullet weight to make this case capacity work. Its not a matter of just putting enough powder to a bullet to horse power it out there. We need enough bullet resistance to make the powder ignite and burn efficently and 75 grains is not enough bullet weight to make this case capacity work well.

    In my testing of this bullet in my 224 Allen Mag prototype shot well but I could not get velocity any higher then what my 22-6mm AI was able to get. That is not entirely true, my 224 was getting roughly 30 fps more velocity but burning 15-18 grains more powder to get it, pointless.
     
  6. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

    Messages:
    6,848
    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2004
    Tbrown9124,

    The 224 Clark is basically identical to a 22-6mm Rem. The 22-6mm AI is slighly larger then this.

    A 22-06 is much larger then any of these.

    When you start to play with these very large small caliber wildcats, you really have to pay special attention to what bullets and barrels you use. Twist rate is critical.

    The problem is that all the heavy cup jacketed 22 cal bullets on the market now are designed for velocities in the 2600-2800 fps muzzle velocity ranges. Add 500-600 fps to this and you have nothing but trouble.

    You need to slow down the twist rate on the barrels to min that will stabilize the bullet. YOu also need to use a rifling design that is as gentle on the bullets as possible. IT becomes quite a balancing game to make it work right and there are always issues to deal with.