Butt stock shape question

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by royinidaho, Jan 26, 2007.

  1. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    I'm thinking that the angle of the cut of the butt on a stock can make a difference on muzzle jump.

    Note that recoil is not an issue.

    What is the difference if the butt is cut this way: |
    What about this way: \
    or this way: /

    Again I'm not worried about felt recoil, just if there is any affect on muzzle jump, even with a brake.
     
  2. James Jones

    James Jones Well-Known Member

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    the angle your refering to is called the "pitch" I think and alot depends on the other things on the stock , like the drop at comb , cast and so on.

    I would think that you would want the pad to be 90 deg off the bore line for best results , cut to far back at the top and the gun may want to rise up your shoulder in the rear cut to far back in the bottom it may want to dig into your armpit.
    I will say that I have a 12 Rem 870 with the Mesa tactical but stock on it thats just under the bore line but it on the same plane as the bore woth the but 90 degs off the bore and it staty on target alot better (less muzzel rise) than the Speed Feed stock that had a slight downward angle that was on it.
     

  3. davewilson

    davewilson Well-Known Member

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    perpendicular to the barrel...only way to fly.
     
  4. CatShooter

    CatShooter Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    I'm thinking that the angle of the cut of the butt on a stock can make a difference on muzzle jump.

    Again I'm not worried about felt recoil, just if there is any affect on muzzle jump, even with a brake.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    It's not the angle of the butt, it's the relationship between the point of contact of the shoulder, and the axis of the bore line.

    If your shoulder contacts the stock directly inline with the bore, the muzzle will NOT rise a bit.

    Muzzle brakes can hold the muzzle down by venting a large part of the gas out the top. Many are designed this way.

    .