Bullet weight for LRH questions

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by TBuckus, Dec 22, 2013.

  1. TBuckus

    TBuckus Well-Known Member

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    Been reading more articles on this site and am I safe to assume that a heavier bullet will be more accurate over distance than a lighter bullet, even though it will drop more?
    I used to think that a lighter faster bullet is the way to go.

    Example; 130gr Accubonds vs 150 gr. Accubond LR's in a .270. The LR's will drop and additional 5" at 600 yds, but that would be my max that I am looking at shooting to.

    My guns are standard hunting rifles. No heavy long barrels if that is a factor.
     
  2. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Your are on the right track.

    Have to hit where you're aiming, first and foremost.

    Next is terminal performance.

    Select the bullet that shoots best and go with it.

    In the 270 Win I've settled on 140 grain offerings. First Berger, then Nosler and Hornady.

    It's all about accuracy and wind drift. BC is the key for wind drift.

    If deer of any sort is the biggest target the 130 will do but 140 VLDs and Noslers "seem" a bit better.
     

  3. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    It depends on distance and wind. The heavier higher BC bullet will always end up the faster bullet at some point. After the smaller bullet, which slows faster, drops to the same velocity as the larger bullet, the rate of slow down and drop in the smaller bullet happens very fast. The higher BC bullet which in many cases is heavier may start out slower but will retain velocity longer due to the higher BC and less drag. So in the end the heavier higher BC bullet that starts out slower will arrive with a higher velocity , more energy, better chance of expansion and is less effected by wind. Not to mention the higher BC bullet will usually carry a higher sectional density which I prefer of game for terminal performance.

    Bottom line, the less drag equals more retained velocity, and has less wind drift which is many cases is what we want to aid in precise point of impact and terminal damage.

    Jeff
     
  4. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

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    The two key (and only) factors in wind drift are velocity and BC. Usually the heavier bullet of like form will have a higher BC than the lighter bullet, but the lighter bullet will atain higher velocity. That said, with bullets in the same cal and similar form factor the heavier will usually trump the lighter in the long run because the difference in BC will be of greater long range benefit than the higher velocity of the lighter bullet.

    In my experience running a lighter bullet against the heavier bullet on a balisitic calc, the heavier higher BC bullet will have a very slight windage edge right from the start that increases as you go down range. The heavier bullet usually catches up in velocity about 1K give or take. You can check this out very easy by playing with a ballistic calc.

    So in the sense that the heavier bullet bucks wind better, it is more accurate than the lighter because it gives you a greater degree of forgiveness if your wind dope is not spot on. Otherwise, the difference in accuracy does not depend on bullet size or weight.

    This all assumes you know the exact distance. If you are guesstimating distance the advantage could go to the lighter, flatter bullet way down range.
     
  5. TBuckus

    TBuckus Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone.
    I'll pick up some bullets that are heavier than what I have now and do some reloading and see how they work out.