Bullet stability

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by midwesthunter, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. midwesthunter

    midwesthunter Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to be test some new bullets to see if they will stabilize in a specific twist. At what distance will I need to shoot to verify? Will 100 do? Or should I stretH it ouT to 200-400 yards
     
  2. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    My experience has been that I start at 100 yards. If they are stable (goup well) at 100, they are almost always good at longer ranges. If they are not good at 100, and I know I'm at the edge or outside of the recommended twist for a particular bullet, I will try them at 300 and see how the perform. I have had cases where I do get a bullet stabilizing out at 200+ yards.
     

  3. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

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    Measure your twist. Plug in the data on JBM's website for calculating stability. Then, you'll know if they will "stabilize."

    Next, you can shoot them at 100, 200, 300+ yds to see if the accuracy is acceptable in your rifle.

    -- richard
     
  4. Michael Eichele

    Michael Eichele Well-Known Member

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    I have had loads that by judging at 100yards I would think were worthless that I knew were on the edge of the limit. Bullets were slightly keyholed at 100 yards while perfectly straight on at 300 with good accuracy. In my experience, bullets tend to stabilize more down range, even though velocity is decaying. Even if on the edge. I have only had one load that never stabilized and that was the old Barnes XFB 200 grain shot out of a 12 twist 308. They hit the target sideways at 25 yards.
     
  5. midwesthunter

    midwesthunter Well-Known Member

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    Numbers say border line it will work. I'm hoping the higher velocity pushes it through.