Bullet Comparator for sorting bullets?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Jinx-), Jun 7, 2010.

  1. Jinx-)

    Jinx-) Well-Known Member

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    So I'm looking for the tool which I can use to sort my bullets, I have 3 calibers which I regularly reload they are .224, .277 and .308, and it looks like there are 4 or maybe 5 choices, the hex tool from Sinclair, hex tool from PTG, then Sinclair Bullet Sorting Stand with Dial Indicator, Sinclair Comparator which attaches to the caliper and Hornady LNL Comparator which was originally made by Stony Point. So I need to choose one and I'm leaning towards Hornady LNL Comparator.

    Do you think I'm on the right track? Maybe there is something I should know before I buy one?

    Thanx!
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2010
  2. Gene

    Gene Well-Known Member

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    The hex tool is junk, don't wast your money. The Hornady LNL is good. I use the Davidson base with multiple nosepieces sold by Sinclair. They attach to the caliper. I have the Hornady, but never use it anymore.
     

  3. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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    Get the John Buhay tool. It is the best that there is.
     
  4. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

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    What is that and where do you buy it?
     
  5. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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  6. Jinx-)

    Jinx-) Well-Known Member

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    Wow, John Buhay tool is something, but I think Hornady LNL Comparator will do just fine, for a bearing surface measurement combination of 2 LNL Comparators can take an adequate measurement, and if I see their result as insufficient I will defiantly try to acquire on of those John Buhay stands.

    Thank you all!!!
     
  7. Jinx-)

    Jinx-) Well-Known Member

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  8. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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    Buhay Tool---Quit screwing around. LOL....
     
  9. milanuk

    milanuk Well-Known Member

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    For a while, I went with the (then Stoney Point) Hornady LnL tool method, as I already had a box full of them, what was a couple more inserts? ;) With the radiused edges on the holes in the inserts, I had a hard time getting consistent readings (as others have mentioned) although with enough time (and practice) I could usually get decent results.

    Early last year I happened upon a good deal on a used Tubb comparator with a couple sets of inserts (.22 & 6mm). I'm not sure of the exact relationship between them... I gather that the Tubb is a close copy of the Buhay tool, and I'm not entirely sure where Hoover fits in, other than when I ordered new inserts from Tubb's company and got told three weeks later that the parts were on back order, and I waited another three weeks and got no response... I contacted Hoover @ Accuracy One and had a set of inserts on the way inside a week. Later that fall I got another set of inserts from Hoover, again no problems and prompt service.

    I can't say as I see a *huge* improvement when using sorted bullets (which if I go to that much trouble I usually also meplat uniform and point them) over 'untouched' bullets... a point or two maybe, which could just as easily be the conditions. But the mental safety blanket aspect is appreciated ;)
     
  10. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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    The Tubbs tool is the Buhay tool. You will notice the difference if you shoot 1K competition with the right equipment and technique. A sporter with amateur rests and not using perfect technique it will be extremely difficult to notice and more importantly isolate vertical dispersion vs just shooter error and or equipment variation. Believe me it does make a difference BUT YOU have to have equipment that will benefit from this. There is a laundry list of things that should be done prior to worrying about bearing surface. The vast majority of people who do this sort of thing have so much variability in their respective shooting procedure that this will make very little difference.
     
  11. Jinx-)

    Jinx-) Well-Known Member

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    well before Hornady LNL Comparator I used bullet seating stem from Lee to sort my bullets :) this way I was able to sort them in 4 - 5 different groups, this way my groups stayed 0.5 - 0.3 MOA after I used LNL Comparator my groups open up to 0.7 - 1 MOA then I went back to Lee stem and sort bullets previously sorted by LNL, and in every sorted batch I found +- 0.002 variations. I could also blame wind for the day I was shooting, but I had vertical jumps as well as horizontal... wind was swirling and gusting 15 - 17 mph...
     
  12. milanuk

    milanuk Well-Known Member

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    The wind will do that, quite easily in my experience. Thus my comment above.
     
  13. Gene

    Gene Well-Known Member

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    I have an LNL also, but don't use it because it is not consistent. Look at page 34 of the new Sinclair catalog, specificallly at the Davidson Seating depth checker. With two same caliber nose pieces, i.e., two in .308, one on each calpier arm, you can easily and accurately measure bullet bearing surface. Just line them up precisely.

    When you order, also get the correct size base piece, and with it and one nose piece, you can measure OAL to the ogive.
     
  14. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    I own the hex as well as the others, and there's not a nickel's worth of difference if used correctly. In either case you work off a gauge line that only becomes a reference point. Anything more and your kidding yourself. The diameters they use are generic, and it's gonna be the samething with the Hornaday outfit unless you take the time to build your own bushings. I did this and have about forty different ones I use to measure cases at my own computed gauge line. I've seen exactly one good bullet comparitor in my lifetime, and it wasn't for sale (Ferris Pendell built it). The Hornaday, Stoney Point, and the Sinclair hex are for checking seating depths and not much more.
    gary