Borescope-should one use one,which,why?

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by LR3, May 27, 2011.

  1. LR3

    LR3 Well-Known Member

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    Would appreciate advice on whether a bore scope is worth it for large bores 30 up to 375, does help with cleaning and accuracy, which you would recommend, and any other advice for what to look for. Do you scope after cleaning? Has it helped your accuracy. Thanks
     
  2. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    Without a bore scope, all you can really do with the naked eye, is verify that the hole goes all the way through!
     

  3. Varmint

    Varmint Well-Known Member

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    I would say the Hawkeye scope is a good one to get.....what you can do with it. you can check to see how clean the barrel is,check how good the rifling is, check for Throat erosion,check the crown......butt some times you will find that some copper left in the barrel is a good thing.
     
  4. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    To examine for barrel condition nothing else will let you see up close. The Hawkeye is about the only one that is as effective for the cost. On the big bore barrels the focusable unit will give you a better look.

    Hawkeye Borescope Slim kits and individual components by Gradient Lens Corporation

    I bought the 17" Pro Slim Kit 17" (435 mm) PS17-NVK with the extra 90 degree eyepiece. This really helps when the action is in the stock.
     
  5. BuckSnort

    BuckSnort Well-Known Member

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    I will take a wild guess and say that 99% of shooters have no need for a bore scope..
     
  6. shortgrass

    shortgrass Well-Known Member

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    For the average guy it depends on how 'serious' one is about their 'shootin' equipment. If ya' need GPS, a ballistics/loading program, a hand held weather station, and the 'best' custom barrel, you shouldn't be without a Hawkeye. If the inside of that barrel isn't "up to snuff", that other stuff is just wasted! And ya' can't get a close-up look with the naked eye, just guesses. I didn't think I needed one either,,, 'till I bought one and used it!
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2011
  7. LouBoyd

    LouBoyd Well-Known Member

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    1. I don't use a borescope when cleaning. I just watch what the patch colors say about copper and propellant fouling. Removing copper fouling is important, but being "squeeky clean is not.

    2. I've never had a borescope improve the accracy of a barrel. Shooting tells when to replace a barrel. A borscope may show what's gone wrong. Sometimes not. I never repalce a barrel based on what I see with the scope only how it shoots. A borescope can show throat erosion, but s can a bullet and a caliper. Borescopes cant' mesure bore diameter accurately enough to be useful.

    3. Hawkeye is the only commercial one I've used. To be useful it needs be able to look at the side of the bore and focus. A good light is necessary. A video camera instead of an eyepiece is handy.

    So why have a borescope?

    It may be useful in situations where you need to evaluate a rifle without shooting it, such as at a gunshop or gunshow when buying an unknown firearm. Once you buy a gun ther's no point looking with the borescope. Shooting it will tell you the good or bad news. Barrels can have a lot of imperfections which show up with a borescope but the rifle may still shoot ok. Some barrls look ok but shoot poortly. What a borescope can show is a miscentered chamber which could cause even a new rifle to shoot bad, but it still won't fix it.

    . I find more "non gun" uses for a borescope than working on rifles. . I've found it very useful for working on vehicles, generators, pumps, and computers.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2011
  8. RDM416

    RDM416 Well-Known Member

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    This sounds like pretty good advice from LouBoyd. Like he said, the rifle either shoots good or it don't. With a borescope you may be able to "see" why it don't, but that don't fix anything...... you still need a new barrel and the fact it was not shooting good has already told you that!

    I must admit that I am a gadget freak and have started to buy a borescope several times. I'm sure that one of these days I won't get myself talked out of it before I hit the "buy" button on a Sinclair order.:D
     
  9. Fitch

    Fitch Well-Known Member

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    All the target tells you is the rifle is not shooting good, not that the barrel needs to be replaced. Last time I checked there are literally dozens of causes for rifles not shooting good. The borescope is useful as a differential disgnostic tool. I've used it, in combination with slugging, to inspect barrels and either confirm or eliminate them as the cause of an accuracy problem.

    Saying "a borescope never fixed a problem may be true", but it's a strawman argument because nobody ever said it did. As far as I know, slugging never fixed a problem either, but it is certainly a useful diagnostic tool.

    Fitch
     
  10. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    The bore scope is an invaluable tool and has many uses.

    They can resolve any issues or questions that can't be answered by looking down the barrel.

    I have looked down many barrels in over 50 years of hunting and shooting and was amazed
    the first time I used one.

    Looking through a barrel you have only one plane to look at and if it is reasonable good
    and clean it can look great. But when you look at the Chamber, Neck and throat area,
    free bore, rifling and the crown 90o to the bore It becomes obvious that all is not as good
    as you had thought.

    It is the only way to really look at a Crown.

    And even though you think you have all of the copper and carbon there is only one sure fire
    way to know and that is with a Bore scope.

    The carbon buildup at the end of the case neck is almost impossible to see with out the scope.

    They are an expensive tool and may not be nessary for the average hunter that shoots under
    400 yards with factory ammo, But just like the chronograph, a bore scope can be an invaluable
    tool for the long range hunter/shooter.

    If you watch on line you can find some good deals on used ones.

    J E CUSTOM
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2011
  11. LR3

    LR3 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for every bodies comments and advice - it seems like it will help in removing some of the variable s involved in plus 1000 yes shooting and will order one
     
  12. Andy Backus

    Andy Backus Field Editor

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    I wanted to bring back this topic. Any fresh opinions out there?
     
  13. Dosh

    Dosh Well-Known Member

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    Since this thread is 6+ years old, many devices have hit the market. Check Amazon or e-bay. I saw a couple that connect to a smartphone for $20-30. Haven't seen any reviews and I'm sure you need an app for it also. A friend has the Lyman scope ($200 Amazon, $300 elsewhere) and says it "serves the purpose", but I haven't seen it being used. My gunsmith friend scopes my rifles with his Hawkeye. Replies to this resurrected thread should be interesting.
     
  14. blinderthanascope

    blinderthanascope Well-Known Member

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    I was tinkin of getting a lyman what's the scoop on those are they good enough to see if you have carbon or crown wear? from what I have been reading they are ok but I would like to hear some pinions.